RISPERDAL CONSTA (Page 12 of 14)

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenesis — Oral

Risperidone was administered in the diet at doses of 0.63, 2.5, and 10 mg/kg for 18 months to mice and for 25 months to rats. These doses are equivalent to approximately 0.2, 0.75, and 3 times (mice) and 0.4, 1.5, and 6 times (rats) the MRHD of 16 mg/day, based on mg/m2 body surface area. A maximum tolerated dose was not achieved in male mice. There was a significant increase in pituitary gland adenomas, endocrine pancreatic adenomas, and mammary gland adenocarcinomas. The table below summarizes the multiples of the human dose on mg/m2 (mg/kg) basis at which these tumors occurred.

Multiples of Maximum Human Dose in mg/m2 (mg/kg)
Tumor Type Species Sex Lowest Effect Level Highest No-Effect Level
Pituitary adenomas mouse Female 0.75 (9.4) 0.2 (2.4)
Endocrine pancreas adenomas rat Male 1.5 (9.4) 0.4 (2.4)
Mammary gland adenocarcinomas mouse Female 0.2 (2.4) none
rat Female 0.4 (2.4) none
rat Male 6.0 (37.5) 1.5 (9.4)
Mammary gland neoplasm, Total rat Male 1.5 (9.4) 0.4 (2.4)

Antipsychotic drugs have been shown to chronically elevate prolactin levels in rodents. Serum prolactin levels were not measured during the risperidone carcinogenicity studies; however, measurements during subchronic toxicity studies showed that risperidone elevated serum prolactin levels 5–6 fold in mice and rats at the same doses used in the carcinogenicity studies. An increase in mammary, pituitary, and endocrine pancreas neoplasms has been found in rodents after chronic administration of other antipsychotic drugs and is considered to be prolactin-mediated. The relevance for human risk of the findings of prolactin-mediated endocrine tumors in rodents is unclear [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)].

Carcinogenesis — Intramuscular

Risperidone was evaluated in a 24-month carcinogenicity study in which SPF Wistar rats were treated every 2 weeks with intramuscular (IM) injections of either 5 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg of risperidone. These doses are 1 and 8 times the MRHD (50 mg) on a mg/m2 basis. A control group received injections of 0.9% NaCl, and a vehicle control group was injected with placebo microspheres. There was a significant increase in pituitary gland adenomas, endocrine pancreas adenomas, and adrenomedullary pheochromocytomas at 8 times the IM MRHD on a mg/m2 basis. The incidence of mammary gland adenocarcinomas was significantly increased in female rats at both doses (1 and 8 times the IM MRHD on a mg/m2 basis). A significant increase in renal tubular tumors (adenoma, adenocarcinomas) was observed in male rats at 8 times the IM MRHD on a mg/m2 basis. Plasma exposures (AUC) in rats were 0.3 and 2 times (at 5 and 40 mg/kg, respectively) the expected plasma exposure (AUC) at the IM MRHD.

Dopamine D2 receptor antagonists have been shown to chronically elevate prolactin levels in rodents. Serum prolactin levels were not measured during the carcinogenicity studies of oral risperidone; however, measurements taken during subchronic toxicity studies showed that oral risperidone elevated serum prolactin levels 5- to 6-fold in mice and rats at the same doses used in the oral carcinogenicity studies. Serum prolactin levels increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 6- and 1.5-fold in male and female rats, respectively, at the end of the 24-month treatment with risperidone every 2 weeks IM. Increases in the incidence of pituitary gland, endocrine pancreas, and mammary gland neoplasms have been found in rodents after chronic administration of other antipsychotic drugs and may be prolactin-mediated.

The relevance for human risk of the findings of prolactin-mediated endocrine tumors in rodents is unknown [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)].

Mutagenesis

No evidence of mutagenic or clastogenic potential for risperidone was found in the in vitro tests of Ames gene mutation, the mouse lymphoma assay, rat hepatocyte DNA-repair assay, the chromosomal aberration test in human lymphocytes, Chinese hamster ovary cells, or in the in vivo micronucleus test in mice, and the sex-linked recessive lethal test in Drosophila.

In addition, no evidence of mutagenic potential was found in the in vitro Ames reverse mutation test for RISPERDAL CONSTA®.

Impairment of Fertility

Oral risperidone (0.16 to 5 mg/kg) impaired mating, but not fertility, in rat reproductive studies at doses 0.1 to 3 times the oral maximum recommended human dose (MRHD of 16 mg/day) based on mg/m2 body surface area. The effect appeared to be in females, since impaired mating behavior was not noted in the male fertility study. In a subchronic study in Beagle dogs in which oral risperidone was administered at doses of 0.31 to 5 mg/kg, sperm motility and concentration were decreased at doses 0.6 to 10 times the oral MRHD on mg/m2 basis. Dose-related decreases were also noted in serum testosterone at the same doses. Serum testosterone and sperm parameters partially recovered, but remained decreased after treatment was discontinued. A no-effect dose could not be determined in either rat or dog.

14 CLINICAL STUDIES

14.1 Schizophrenia

The effectiveness of RISPERDAL CONSTA® in the treatment of schizophrenia was established, in part, on the basis of extrapolation from the established effectiveness of the oral formulation of risperidone. In addition, the effectiveness of RISPERDAL CONSTA® in the treatment of schizophrenia was established in a 12-week, placebo-controlled trial in adult psychotic inpatients and outpatients who met the DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia.

Efficacy data were obtained from 400 patients with schizophrenia who were randomized to receive injections of 25 mg, 50 mg, or 75 mg RISPERDAL CONSTA® or placebo every 2 weeks. During a 1-week run-in period, patients were discontinued from other antipsychotics and were titrated to a dose of 4 mg oral RISPERDAL®. Patients who received RISPERDAL CONSTA® were given doses of oral RISPERDAL® (2 mg for patients in the 25-mg group, 4 mg for patients in the 50-mg group, and 6 mg for patients in the 75-mg group) for the 3 weeks after the first injection to provide therapeutic plasma concentrations until the main release phase of risperidone from the injection site had begun. Patients who received placebo injections were given placebo tablets.

Efficacy was evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), a validated, multi-item inventory, composed of five subscales to evaluate positive symptoms, negative symptoms, disorganized thoughts, uncontrolled hostility/excitement, and anxiety/depression.

The primary efficacy variable in this trial was change from baseline to endpoint in the total PANSS score. The mean total PANSS score at baseline for schizophrenic patients in this study was 81.5.

Total PANSS scores showed significant improvement in the change from baseline to endpoint in schizophrenic patients treated with each dose of RISPERDAL CONSTA® (25 mg, 50 mg, or 75 mg) compared with patients treated with placebo. While there were no statistically significant differences between the treatment effects for the three dose groups, the effect size for the 75 mg dose group was actually numerically less than that observed for the 50 mg dose group.

Subgroup analyses did not indicate any differences in treatment outcome as a function of age, race, or gender.

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