Risperidone (Page 10 of 11)

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenesis

Carcinogenicity studies were conducted in Swiss albino mice and Wistar rats. Risperidone was administered in the diet at doses of 0.63 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, and 10 mg/kg for 18 months to mice and for 25 months to rats. These doses are equivalent to 2.4, 9.4, and 37.5 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) for schizophrenia (16 mg/day) on a mg/kg basis or 0.2, 0.75, and 3 times the MRHD (mice) or 0.4, 1.5, and 6 times the MRHD (rats) on a mg/m2 basis. A maximum tolerated dose was not achieved in male mice. There were statistically significant increases in pituitary gland adenomas, endocrine pancreas adenomas, and mammary gland adenocarcinomas. The following table summarizes the multiples of the human dose on a mg/m2 (mg/kg) basis at which these tumors occurred.

Multiples of Maximum

Human Dose in mg/m2 (mg/kg)

Lowest

Highest No-

Tumor type

Species

Sex

Effect Level

Effect Level

Pituitary adenomas mouse female 0.75 (9.4) 0.2 (2.4)
Endocrine pancreas adenomas rat male 1.5 (9.4) 0.4 (2.4)
Mammary gland adenocarcinomas mouse female 0.2 (2.4) none
rat female 0.4 (2.4) none
rat male 6.0 (37.5) 1.5 (9.4)
Mammary gland neoplasm, Total rat male 1.5 (9.4) 0.4 (2.4)

Antipsychotic drugs have been shown to chronically elevate prolactin levels in rodents. Serum prolactin levels were not measured during the risperidone carcinogenicity studies; however, measurements during subchronic toxicity studies showed that risperidone elevated serum prolactin levels 5-6 fold in mice and rats at the same doses used in the carcinogenicity studies. An increase in mammary, pituitary, and endocrine pancreas neoplasms has been found in rodents after chronic administration of other antipsychotic drugs and is considered to be prolactin-mediated. The relevance for human risk of the findings of prolactin-mediated endocrine tumors in rodents is unknown [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)].

Mutagenesis

No evidence of mutagenic potential for risperidone was found in the Ames reverse mutation test, mouse lymphoma assay, in vitro rat hepatocyte DNA-repair assay, in vivo micronucleus test in mice, the sex-linked recessive lethal test in Drosophila , or the chromosomal aberration test in human lymphocytes or Chinese hamster cells.

Impairment of Fertility

Risperidone (0.16 to 5 mg/kg) was shown to impair mating, but not fertility, in Wistar rats in three reproductive studies (two Segments I and a multigenerational study) at doses 0.1 to 3 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) on a mg/m2 basis. The effect appeared to be in females, since impaired mating behavior was not noted in the Segment I study in which males only were treated. In a sub chronic study in Beagle dogs in which risperidone was administered at doses of 0.31 to 5 mg/kg, sperm motility and concentration were decreased at doses 0.6 to10 times the MRHD on a mg/m2 basis. Dose-related decreases were also noted in serum testosterone at the same doses. Serum testosterone and sperm parameters partially recovered, but remained decreased after treatment was discontinued. No no-effect doses were noted in either rat or dog.

14 CLINICAL STUDIES

14.1 Schizophrenia

Adults

Short-Term Efficacy

The efficacy of risperidone in the treatment of schizophrenia was established in four short-term (4- to 8-week) controlled trials of psychotic inpatients who met DSM-III-R criteria for schizophrenia.

Several instruments were used for assessing psychiatric signs and symptoms in these studies, among them the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), a multi-item inventory of general psychopathology traditionally used to evaluate the effects of drug treatment in schizophrenia. The BPRS psychosis cluster (conceptual disorganization, hallucinatory behavior, suspiciousness, and unusual thought content) is considered a particularly useful subset for assessing actively psychotic schizophrenic patients. A second traditional assessment, the Clinical Global Impression (CGI), reflects the impression of a skilled observer, fully familiar with the manifestations of schizophrenia, about the overall clinical state of the patient. In addition, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Scale for Assessing Negative Symptoms (SANS) were employed.

The results of the trials follow:

  1. In a 6-week, placebo-controlled trial (n=160) involving titration of risperidone in doses up to 10 mg/day (twice-daily schedule), risperidone was generally superior to placebo on the BPRS total score, on the BPRS psychosis cluster, and marginally superior to placebo on the SANS.
  2. In an 8-week, placebo-controlled trial (n=513) involving 4 fixed doses of risperidone (2 mg/day, 6 mg/day, 10 mg/day, and 16 mg/day, on a twice-daily schedule), all 4 risperidone groups were generally superior to placebo on the BPRS total score, BPRS psychosis cluster, and CGI severity score; the 3 highest risperidone dose groups were generally superior to placebo on the PANSS negative subscale. The most consistently positive responses on all measures were seen for the 6 mg dose group, and there was no suggestion of increased benefit from larger doses.
  3. In an 8-week, dose comparison trial (n=1356) involving 5 fixed doses of risperidone (1 mg/day, 4 mg/day, 8 mg/day, 12 mg/day, and 16 mg/day, on a twice-daily schedule), the four highest risperidone dose groups were generally superior to the 1 mg risperidone dose group on BPRS total score, BPRS psychosis cluster, and CGI severity score. None of the dose groups were superior to the 1 mg group on the PANSS negative subscale. The most consistently positive responses were seen for the 4 mg dose group.
  4. In a 4-week, placebo-controlled dose comparison trial (n=246) involving 2 fixed doses of risperidone (4 and 8 mg/day on a once-daily schedule), both risperidone dose groups were generally superior to placebo on several PANSS measures, including a response measure (>20% reduction in PANSS total score), PANSS total score, and the BPRS psychosis cluster (derived from PANSS). The results were generally stronger for the 8 mg than for the 4 mg dose group.

Long-Term Efficacy

In a longer-term trial, 365 adult outpatients’s predominantly meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia and who had been clinically stable for at least 4 weeks on an antipsychotic medication were randomized to risperidone (2-8 mg/day) or to an active comparator, for 1 to 2 years of observation for relapse. Patients receiving risperidone experienced a significantly longer time to relapse over this time period compared to those receiving the active comparator.

Pediatrics

Due to Janssen Pharmaceuticals Corporation’s marketing exclusivity rights, this drug product is not labeled for use in pediatric patients with schizophrenia. Clinical trial information for pediatric patients with schizophrenia, 13 to 17 years of age, is approved for Janssen Pharmaceuticals Corporation’s risperidone drug products.

14.2 Bipolar mania — Monotherapy

Adults

The efficacy of risperidone in the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes was established in two short-term (3-week) placebo-controlled trials in patients who met the DSM-IV criteria for Bipolar I Disorder with manic or mixed episodes. These trials included patients with or without psychotic features.

The primary rating instrument used for assessing manic symptoms in these trials was the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), an 11-item clinician-rated scale traditionally used to assess the degree of manic symptomatology (irritability, disruptive/aggressive behavior, sleep, elevated mood, speech, increased activity, sexual interest, language/thought disorder, thought content, appearance, and insight) in a range from 0 (no manic features) to 60 (maximum score). The primary outcome in these trials was change from baseline in the YMRS total score. The results of the trials follow:

  1. In one 3-week placebo-controlled trial (n=246), limited to patients with manic episodes, which involved a dose range of risperidone 1-6 mg/day, once daily, starting at 3 mg/day (mean modal dose was 4.1 mg/day), risperidone was superior to placebo in the reduction of YMRS total score.
  2. In another 3-week placebo-controlled trial (n=286), which involved a dose range of 1-6 mg/day, once daily, starting at 3 mg/day (mean modal dose was 5.6 mg/day), risperidone was superior to placebo in the reduction of YMRS total score.

Pediatrics

Due to Janssen Pharmaceuticals Corporation’s marketing exclusivity rights, this drug product is not labeled for use in pediatric patients with bipolar mania. Clinical trial information for pediatric patients with bipolar mania, 10 to 17 years of age, is approved for Janssen Pharmaceuticals Corporation’s risperidone drug products.

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