Simponi

SIMPONI- golimumab injection, solution
Janssen Biotech, Inc.

WARNING: SERIOUS INFECTIONS AND MALIGNANCY

SERIOUS INFECTIONS

Patients treated with SIMPONI® are at increased risk for developing serious infections that may lead to hospitalization or death [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Most patients who developed these infections were taking concomitant immunosuppressants such as methotrexate or corticosteroids.

Discontinue SIMPONI if a patient develops a serious infection.

Reported infections with TNF blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member, include:

  • Active tuberculosis, including reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis have frequently presented with disseminated or extrapulmonary disease. Test patients for latent tuberculosis before SIMPONI use and during therapy. Initiate treatment for latent TB prior to SIMPONI use.
  • Invasive fungal infections including histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, candidiasis, aspergillosis, blastomycosis, and pneumocystosis. Patients with histoplasmosis or other invasive fungal infections may present with disseminated, rather than localized, disease. Antigen and antibody testing for histoplasmosis may be negative in some patients with active infection. Consider empiric antifungal therapy in patients at risk for invasive fungal infections who develop severe systemic illness.
  • Bacterial, viral, and other infections due to opportunistic pathogens, including Legionella and Listeria.

Consider the risks and benefits of treatment with SIMPONI prior to initiating therapy in patients with chronic or recurrent infection.

Monitor patients closely for the development of signs and symptoms of infection during and after treatment with SIMPONI, including the possible development of tuberculosis in patients who tested negative for latent tuberculosis infection prior to initiating therapy [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

MALIGNANCY

Lymphoma and other malignancies, some fatal, have been reported in children and adolescent patients treated with TNF blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] .

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

1.1 Rheumatoid Arthritis

SIMPONI, in combination with methotrexate, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis.

1.2 Psoriatic Arthritis

SIMPONI, alone or in combination with methotrexate, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis.

1.3 Ankylosing Spondylitis

SIMPONI is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with active ankylosing spondylitis.

1.4 Ulcerative Colitis

SIMPONI is indicated in adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis who have demonstrated corticosteroid dependence or who have had an inadequate response to or failed to tolerate oral aminosalicylates, oral corticosteroids, azathioprine, or 6-mercaptopurine for:

  • inducing and maintaining clinical response
  • improving endoscopic appearance of the mucosa during induction
  • inducing clinical remission
  • achieving and sustaining clinical remission in induction responders [see Clinical Studies (14.4)].

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

2.1 Dosage in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis

The SIMPONI dose regimen is 50 mg administered by subcutaneous injection once a month.

For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), SIMPONI should be given in combination with methotrexate and for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS), SIMPONI may be given with or without methotrexate or other nonbiologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs). For patients with RA, PsA, or AS, corticosteroids, non-biologic DMARDs, and/or NSAIDs may be continued during treatment with SIMPONI.

2.2 Dosage in Moderately to Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis

The recommended SIMPONI induction dosage regimen is a 200-mg subcutaneous injection at Week 0, followed by 100 mg at Week 2, and then maintenance therapy with 100 mg every 4 weeks.

2.3 Monitoring to Assess Safety

Prior to initiating SIMPONI and periodically during therapy, evaluate patients for active tuberculosis and tested for latent infection [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Prior to initiating SIMPONI, patients should be tested for hepatitis B viral infection [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

2.4 Important Administration Instructions

SIMPONI is intended for use under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare provider. After proper training in subcutaneous injection technique, a patient may self-inject with SIMPONI if a physician determines that it is appropriate. Instruct patients to follow the directions provided below [see Instructions for Use]:

  • To ensure proper use, allow the prefilled syringe or autoinjector to sit at room temperature outside the carton for at least 30 minutes prior to subcutaneous injection. Do not warm SIMPONI in any other way.
  • Prior to administration, visually inspect the solution for particles and discoloration through the viewing window. SIMPONI is clear to slightly opalescent and colorless to light yellow. Do not use SIMPONI, if the solution is discolored, or cloudy, or if foreign particles are present.
  • Do not use any leftover product remaining in the prefilled syringe or prefilled autoinjector.
  • Instruct patients sensitive to latex not to handle the needle cover on the prefilled syringe or the needle cover of the prefilled syringe within the autoinjector cap because it contains dry natural rubber (a derivative of latex).
  • At the time of dosing, if multiple injections are required, administer the injections at different sites on the body.
  • Rotate injection sites and never give injections into areas where the skin is tender, bruised, red, or hard.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Injection: 50 mg/0.5 mL and 100 mg/mL clear to slightly opalescent, colorless to light yellow solution in a single-dose prefilled syringe or single-dose SmartJect autoinjector.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

None.

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Serious Infections

Patients treated with SIMPONI are at increased risk for developing serious infections involving various organ systems and sites that may lead to hospitalization or death.

Opportunistic infections due to bacterial, mycobacterial, invasive fungal, viral, or parasitic organisms including aspergillosis, blastomycosis, candidiasis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, legionellosis, listeriosis, pneumocystosis, and tuberculosis have been reported with TNF blockers. Patients have frequently presented with disseminated rather than localized disease. The concomitant use of a TNF blocker and abatacept or anakinra was associated with a higher risk of serious infections; therefore, the concomitant use of SIMPONI and these biologic products is not recommended [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6, 5.7) and Drug Interactions (7.2)].

Treatment with SIMPONI should not be initiated in patients with an active infection, including clinically important localized infections. Patients greater than 65 years of age, patients with co-morbid conditions and/or patients taking concomitant immunosuppressants such as corticosteroids or methotrexate may be at greater risk of infection. Consider the risks and benefits of treatment prior to initiating SIMPONI in patients:

  • with chronic or recurrent infection;
  • who have been exposed to tuberculosis;
  • with a history of an opportunistic infection;
  • who have resided or traveled in areas of endemic tuberculosis or endemic mycoses, such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, or blastomycosis; or
  • with underlying conditions that may predispose them to infection.

Monitoring

Closely monitor patients for the development of signs and symptoms of infection during and after treatment with SIMPONI. Discontinue SIMPONI if a patient develops a serious infection, an opportunistic infection, or sepsis. For a patient who develops a new infection during treatment with SIMPONI, perform a prompt and complete diagnostic workup appropriate for an immunocompromised patient, initiate appropriate antimicrobial therapy, and closely monitor them.

Serious Infection in Clinical Trials

In controlled Phase 3 trials through Week 16 in patients with RA, PsA, and AS, serious infections were observed in 1.4% of SIMPONI-treated patients and 1.3% of control-treated patients. In the controlled Phase 3 trials through Week 16 in patients with RA, PsA, and AS, the incidence of serious infections per 100 patient-years of follow-up was 5.7 (95% CI: 3.8, 8.2) for the SIMPONI group and 4.2 (95% CI: 1.8, 8.2) for the placebo group. In the controlled Phase 2/3 trial through Week 6 of SIMPONI induction in UC, the incidence of serious infections in SIMPONI 200/100 mg-treated patients was similar to the incidence of serious infections in placebo-treated patients. Through Week 60, the incidence of serious infections was similar in patients who received SIMPONI induction and 100 mg during maintenance compared with patients who received SIMPONI induction and placebo during the maintenance portion of the UC trial. Serious infections observed in SIMPONI-treated patients included sepsis, pneumonia, cellulitis, abscess, tuberculosis, invasive fungal infections, and hepatitis B infection.

Tuberculosis

Cases of reactivation of tuberculosis or new tuberculosis infections have been observed in patients receiving TNF blockers, including patients who have previously received treatment for latent or active tuberculosis. Evaluate patients for tuberculosis risk factors and test for latent infection prior to initiating SIMPONI and periodically during therapy.

Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection prior to therapy with TNF blockers has been shown to reduce the risk of tuberculosis reactivation during therapy. Prior to initiating SIMPONI, assess if treatment for latent tuberculosis is needed; an induration of 5 mm or greater is a positive tuberculin skin test, even for patients previously vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG).

Consider anti-tuberculosis therapy prior to initiation of SIMPONI in patients with a past history of latent or active tuberculosis in whom an adequate course of treatment cannot be confirmed, and for patients with a negative test for latent tuberculosis but having risk factors for tuberculosis infection. Consultation with a physician with expertise in the treatment of tuberculosis is recommended to aid in the decision whether initiating anti-tuberculosis therapy is appropriate for an individual patient.

Cases of active tuberculosis have occurred in patients treated with SIMPONI during and after treatment for latent tuberculosis. Monitor patients for the development of signs and symptoms of tuberculosis including patients who tested negative for latent tuberculosis infection prior to initiating therapy, patients who are on treatment for latent tuberculosis, or patients who were previously treated for tuberculosis infection.

Consider tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis in patients who develop a new infection during SIMPONI treatment, especially in patients who have previously or recently traveled to countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis, or who have had close contact with a person with active tuberculosis.

In the controlled and uncontrolled portions of the Phase 2 RA and Phase 3 RA, PsA, and AS trials, the incidence of active TB was 0.23 and 0 per 100 patient-years in 2347 SIMPONI-treated patients and 674 placebo-treated patients, respectively. Cases of TB included pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. The overwhelming majority of the TB cases occurred in countries with a high incidence rate of TB. In the controlled Phase 2/3 trial of SIMPONI induction through Week 6 in UC, no cases of TB were observed in SIMPONI 200/100 mg-treated patients or in placebo-treated patients. Through Week 60, the incidence per 100 patient-years of TB in patients who received SIMPONI induction and 100 mg during the maintenance portion of the UC trial was 0.52 (95% CI: 0.11, 1.53). One case of TB was observed in the placebo maintenance group in a patient who received SIMPONI intravenous (IV) induction.

Invasive Fungal Infections

If patients develop a serious systemic illness and they reside or travel in regions where mycoses are endemic, consider invasive fungal infection in the differential diagnosis. Consider appropriate empiric antifungal therapy, and take into account both the risk for severe fungal infection and the risks of antifungal therapy while a diagnostic workup is being performed. Antigen and antibody testing for histoplasmosis may be negative in some patients with active infection. To aid in the management of such patients, consider consultation with a physician with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal infections.

Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation

The use of TNF blockers including SIMPONI has been associated with reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in patients who are chronic hepatitis B carriers (i.e., surface antigen positive). In some instances, HBV reactivation occurring in conjunction with TNF blocker therapy has been fatal. The majority of these reports have occurred in patients who received concomitant immunosuppressants.

All patients should be tested for HBV infection before initiating TNF-blocker therapy. For patients who test positive for hepatitis B surface antigen, consultation with a physician with expertise in the treatment of hepatitis B is recommended before initiating TNF-blocker therapy. The risks and benefits of treatment should be considered prior to prescribing TNF blockers, including SIMPONI, to patients who are carriers of HBV. Adequate data are not available on whether antiviral therapy can reduce the risk of HBV reactivation in HBV carriers who are treated with TNF blockers. Patients who are carriers of HBV and require treatment with TNF blockers should be closely monitored for clinical and laboratory signs of active HBV infection throughout therapy and for several months following termination of therapy.

In patients who develop HBV reactivation, TNF blockers should be stopped and antiviral therapy with appropriate supportive treatment should be initiated. The safety of resuming TNF blockers after HBV reactivation has been controlled is not known. Therefore, prescribers should exercise caution when considering resumption of TNF blockers in this situation and monitor patients closely.

All MedLibrary.org resources are included in as near-original form as possible, meaning that the information from the original provider has been rendered here with only typographical or stylistic modifications and not with any substantive alterations of content, meaning or intent.

This site is provided for educational and informational purposes only, in accordance with our Terms of Use, and is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a medical doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner or other qualified health professional.

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2021. All Rights Reserved.