Skyrizi (Page 3 of 13)

6.2 Immunogenicity

As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies in the studies described below with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products, including other risankizumab products, may be misleading.

Plaque Psoriasis

By Week 52, approximately 24% (263/1079) of subjects treated with SKYRIZI at the recommended dose developed antibodies to risankizumab-rzaa. Of the subjects who developed antibodies to risankizumab-rzaa, approximately 57% (14% of all subjects treated with SKYRIZI) had antibodies that were classified as neutralizing. Higher antibody titers in approximately 1% of subjects treated with SKYRIZI were associated with lower risankizumab-rzaa concentrations and reduced clinical response.

Psoriatic Arthritis

By Week 28, approximately 12.1% (79/652) of subjects treated with SKYRIZI at the recommended dose developed antibodies to risankizumab-rzaa. None of the subjects who developed antibodies to risankizumab-rzaa had antibodies that were classified as neutralizing. Antibodies to risankizumab-rzaa were not associated with changes in clinical response for psoriatic arthritis. A higher proportion of subjects with anti-drug antibodies experienced hypersensitivity reactions (6.3% (5/79)) and injection site reactions (2.5% (2/79)) compared to subjects without anti-drug antibodies (3.8% (22/574) with hypersensitivity reactions and 0.7% (4/574) with injection site reactions). None of these hypersensitivity and injection site reactions led to discontinuation of risankizumab-rzaa.

Crohn’s D isease

By Week 64, approximately 3.4% (2/58) of subjects treated with SKYRIZI at the recommended induction and maintenance dosages developed antibodies to risankizumab-rzaa. None of the subjects who developed antibodies to risankizumab-rzaa had antibodies that were classified as neutralizing.

6.3 Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been reported during post-approval of SKYRIZI. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to SKYRIZI exposure:

  • Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: eczema and rash

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Pregnancy Exposure Registry

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors outcomes in women who become pregnant while treated with SKYRIZI. Patients should be encouraged to enroll by calling 1-877-302-2161 or visiting http://glowpregnancyregistry.com.

Risk Summary

Available pharmacovigilance and clinical trial data with risankizumab use in pregnant women are insufficient to establish a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or other adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Although there are no data on risankizumab-rzaa, monoclonal antibodies can be actively transported across the placenta, and SKYRIZI may cause immunosuppression in the in utero exposed infant. There are adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with inflammatory bowel disease (see Clinical Considerations).

In an enhanced pre- and post-natal developmental toxicity study, pregnant cynomolgus monkeys were administered subcutaneous doses of 5 or 50 mg/kg risankizumab-rzaa once weekly during the period of organogenesis up to parturition. Increased fetal/infant loss was noted in pregnant monkeys at the 50 mg/kg dose (see Data). The 50 mg/kg dose in pregnant monkeys resulted in approximately 10 times the exposure (AUC) in humans administered the 600 mg induction regimen and 39 times the exposure (AUC) to the 360 mg maintenance doses, respectively. No risankizumab-rzaa-related effects on functional or immunological development were observed in infant monkeys from birth through 6 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings for humans is unknown.

All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Disease-associated maternal and embryo/fetal risk

Published data suggest that the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with inflammatory bowel disease is associated with increased disease activity. Adverse pregnancy outcomes include preterm delivery (before 37 weeks of gestation), low birth weight (less than 2500 g) infants, and small for gestational age at birth.

Fetal/Neonatal adverse reactions

Transport of endogenous IgG antibodies across the placenta increases as pregnancy progresses, and peaks during the third trimester. Because risankizumab may interfere with immune response to infections, risks and benefits should be considered prior to administering live vaccines to infants exposed to SKYRIZI in utero. There are insufficient data regarding infant serum levels of risankizumab at birth and the duration of persistence of risankizumab in infant serum after birth. Although a specific timeframe to delay live virus immunizations in infants exposed in utero is unknown, a minimum of 5 months after birth should be considered because of the half-life of the product.

Data

Animal Data

An enhanced pre- and post-natal developmental toxicity study was conducted in cynomolgus monkeys. Pregnant cynomolgus monkeys were administered weekly subcutaneous doses of risankizumab-rzaa of 5 or 50 mg/kg from gestation day 20 to parturition, and the cynomolgus monkeys (mother and infants) were monitored for 6 months after delivery. No maternal toxicity was noted in this study. There were no treatment-related effects on growth and development, malformations, developmental immunotoxicology, or neurobehavioral development. However, a dose-dependent increase in fetal/infant loss was noted in the risankizumab-rzaa-treated groups (32% and 43% in the 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg groups, respectively) compared with the vehicle control group (19%). The increased fetal/infant loss in the 50 mg/kg group was considered to be related to risankizumab-rzaa treatment. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for maternal toxicity was identified as 50 mg/kg and the NOAEL for developmental toxicity was identified as 5 mg/kg. On an exposure (AUC) basis, the 5 mg/kg dose in pregnant monkeys resulted in approximately 1.24 times the exposure in humans administered the 600 mg induction regimen and 5 times the exposure in humans administered the 360 mg maintenance doses, respectively. In the infants, mean serum concentrations increased in a dose-dependent manner and were approximately 17%-86% of the respective maternal concentrations. Following delivery, most adult female cynomolgus monkeys and all infants from the risankizumab-rzaa-treated groups had measurable serum concentrations of risankizumab-rzaa up to 91 days postpartum. Serum concentrations were below detectable levels at 180 days postpartum.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no data on the presence of risankizumab-rzaa in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Endogenous maternal IgG and monoclonal antibodies are transferred in human milk. The effects of local gastrointestinal exposure and limited systemic exposure in the breastfed infant to risankizumab-rzaa are unknown. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for SKYRIZI and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from SKYRIZI or from the underlying maternal condition.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of SKYRIZI have not been established in pediatric patients.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Of the 2234 subjects with plaque psoriasis exposed to SKYRIZI, 243 subjects were 65 years or older and 24 subjects were 75 years or older. No overall differences in SKYRIZI exposure, safety, or effectiveness were observed between older and younger subjects who received SKYRIZI. However, the number of subjects aged 65 years and older was not sufficient to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects.

Clinical studies of SKYRIZI for the treatment of Crohn’s disease did not include sufficient numbers of subjects 65 years of age and older to determine whether they respond differently from younger adult subjects.

No clinically meaningful differences in the pharmacokinetics of risankizumab-rzaa were observed in geriatric subjects compared to younger adult subjects with Crohn’s disease [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)].

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