SULINDAC (Page 2 of 8)

Special Populations

Pediatric

The pharmacokinetics of sulindac have not been investigated in pediatric patients.

Race

Pharmacokinetic differences due to race have not been identified.

Hepatic Insufficiency

Patients with acute and chronic hepatic disease may require reduced doses of sulindac compared to patients with normal hepatic function since hepatic metabolism is an important elimination pathway.

Following a single dose, plasma concentrations of the active sulfide metabolite have been reported to be higher in patients with alcoholic liver disease compared to healthy normal subjects.

Renal Insufficiency

Sulindac pharmacokinetics have been investigated in patients with renal insufficiency. The disposition of sulindac was studied in end-stage renal disease patients requiring hemodialysis. Plasma concentrations of sulindac and its sulfone metabolite were comparable to those of normal healthy volunteers whereas concentrations of the active sulfide metabolite were significantly reduced. Plasma protein binding was reduced and the AUC of the unbound sulfide metabolite was about half that in healthy subjects.

Sulindac and its metabolites are not significantly removed from the blood in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

Since sulindac is eliminated primarily by the kidneys, patients with significantly impaired renal function should be closely monitored.

A lower daily dosage should be anticipated to avoid excessive drug accumulation.

In controlled clinical studies sulindac was evaluated in the following five conditions:

1. Osteoarthritis

In patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of sulindac was demonstrated by clinical measurements that included: assessments by both patient and investigator of overall response; decrease in disease activity as assessed by both patient and investigator; improvement in ARA Functional Class; relief of night pain; improvement in overall evaluation of pain, including pain on weight bearing and pain on active and passive motion; improvement in joint mobility, range of motion, and functional activities; decreased swelling and tenderness; and decreased duration of stiffness following prolonged inactivity.

In clinical studies in which dosages were adjusted according to patient needs, sulindac, 200 to 400 mg daily was shown to be comparable in effectiveness to aspirin 2400 to 4800 mg daily. Sulindac was generally well tolerated, and patients on it had a lower overall incidence of total adverse effects, of milder gastrointestinal reactions, and of tinnitus than did patients on aspirin. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS.)

2. Rheumatoid arthritis

In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of sulindac was demonstrated by clinical measurements that included: assessments by both patient and investigator of overall response; decrease in disease activity as assessed by both patient and investigator; reduction in overall joint pain; reduction in duration and severity of morning stiffness; reduction in day and night pain; decrease in time required to walk 50 feet; decrease in general pain as measured on a visual analog scale; improvement in the Ritchie articular index; decrease in proximal interphalangeal joint size; improvement in ARA Functional Class; increase in grip strength; reduction in painful joint count and score; reduction in swollen joint count and score; and increased flexion and extension of the wrist.

In clinical studies in which dosages were adjusted according to patient needs, sulindac 300 to 400 mg daily was shown to be comparable in effectiveness to aspirin 3600 to 4800 mg daily. Sulindac was generally well tolerated, and patients on it had a lower overall incidence of total adverse effects, of milder gastrointestinal reactions, and of tinnitus than did patients on aspirin. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS.)

In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, sulindac may be used in combination with gold salts at usual dosage levels. In clinical studies, sulindac added to the regimen of gold salts usually resulted in additional symptomatic relief but did not alter the course of the underlying disease.

3. Ankylosing spondylitis

In patients with ankylosing spondylitis, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of sulindac was demonstrated by clinical measurements that included: assessments by both patient and investigator of overall response; decrease in disease activity as assessed by both patient and investigator; improvement in ARA Functional Class; improvement in patient and investigator evaluation of spinal pain, tenderness and/or spasm; reduction in the duration of morning stiffness; increase in the time to onset of fatigue; relief of night pain; increase in chest expansion; and increase in spinal mobility evaluated by fingers-to-floor distance, occiput to wall distance, the Schober Test, and the Wright Modification of the Schober Test. In a clinical study in which dosages were adjusted according to patient need, sulindac 200 to 400 mg daily was as effective as indomethacin 75 to 150 mg daily. In a second study, sulindac 300 to 400 mg daily was comparable in effectiveness to phenylbutazone 400 to 600 mg daily. Sulindac was better tolerated than phenylbutazone. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS.)

4. Acute painful shoulder(Acute subacromial bursitis/supraspinatus tendinitis)

In patients with acute painful shoulder (acute subacromial bursitis/supraspinatus tendinitis), the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of sulindac was demonstrated by clinical measurements that included: assessments by both patient and investigator of overall response; relief of night pain, spontaneous pain, and pain on active motion; decrease in local tenderness; and improvement in range of motion measured by abduction, and internal and external rotation. In clinical studies in acute painful shoulder, sulindac 300 to 400 mg daily and oxyphenbutazone 400 to 600 mg daily were shown to be equally effective and well tolerated.

5. Acute gouty arthritis

In patients with acute gouty arthritis, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of sulindac was demonstrated by clinical measurements that included: assessments by both the patient and investigator of overall response; relief of weight-bearing pain; relief of pain at rest and on active and passive motion; decrease in tenderness; reduction in warmth and swelling; increase in range of motion; and improvement in ability to function. In clinical studies, sulindac at 400 mg daily and phenylbutazone at 600 mg daily were shown to be equally effective. In these short-term studies in which reduction of dosage was permitted according to response, both drugs were equally well tolerated.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of sulindac and other treatment options before deciding to use sulindac. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals (see WARNINGS).

Sulindac is indicated for acute or long-term use in the relief of signs and symptoms of the following:

1. Osteoarthritis

2. Rheumatoid arthritis**

3. Ankylosing spondylitis

4. Acute painful shoulder (Acute subacromial bursitis/supraspinatus tendinitis)

5. Acute gouty arthritis

**The safety and effectiveness of sulindac tablets USP have not been established in rheumatoid arthritis patients who are designated in the American Rheumatism Association classification as Functional Class IV (incapacitated, largely or wholly bedridden, or confined to wheelchair, little or no self-care).

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Sulindac is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to sulindac or the excipients (see DESCRIPTION).

Sulindac should not be given to patients who have experienced asthma, urticaria, or allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, rarely fatal, anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients (see WARNINGS – Anaphylactic/Anaphylactoid Reactions, and PRECAUTIONS – Preexisting Asthma).

Sulindac is contraindicated in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (see WARNINGS).

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