SUPRAX (Page 3 of 7)

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Suprax is available for oral administration in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Film-coated tablets provide 400 mg of cefixime as trihydrate. These are white to off-white, film-coated, capsule shaped tablets with beveled edges and a divided score line on each side. The tablet is debossed with “SUPRAX” across one side and “LUPIN” across the other side.
  • Capsules provide 400 mg of cefixime as trihydrate. These are size “00EL” capsules with pink opaque cap and pink opaque body with “LU” on the cap and “U43″ on the body in black ink. Capsules contain white to yellowish white granular powder.
  • Chewable tablets provide either 100 mg or 150 mg or 200 mg of cefixime as trihydrate. The 100 mg tablet is pink, round tablet, debossed with “SUPRAX 100″ on one side and “LUPIN” on other side. The 150 mg tablet is pink, round tablet, debossed with “SUPRAX 150″ on one side and “LUPIN” on other side. The 200 mg tablet is pink, round tablet, debossed with “SUPRAX 200″ on one side and “LUPIN” on other side.
  • Powder for oral suspension, when reconstituted, provides either 100 mg/5 mL or 200 mg/5 mL or 500 mg/5 mL of cefixime as trihydrate. For 100 mg/5 mL and 200 mg/5 mL, the powder has an off white to pale yellow color and is strawberry flavored. For 500 mg/5 mL, the powder has an off white to cream color and is strawberry flavored.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

Suprax (cefixime) is contraindicated in patients with known allergy to cefixime or other cephalosporins.

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Hypersensitivity Reactions

Anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (including shock and fatalities) have been reported with the use of cefixime.

Before therapy with Suprax is instituted, careful inquiry should be made to determine whether the patient has had previous hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins, penicillins, or other drugs. If this product is to be given to penicillin-sensitive patients, caution should be exercised because cross hypersensitivity among beta-lactam antibiotics has been clearly documented and may occur in up to 10% of patients with a history of penicillin allergy. If an allergic reaction to Suprax occurs, discontinue the drug.

5.2 Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including Suprax, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile.

C. difficile produces toxins A and B which contribute to the development of CDAD. Hypertoxin producing isolates of C. difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy. CDAD must be considered in all patients who present with diarrhea following antibiotic use. Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over two months after the administration of antibacterial agents.

If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, protein supplementation, antibiotic treatment of C. difficile, and surgical evaluation should be instituted as clinically indicated.

5.3 Dose Adjustment in Renal Impairment

The dose of Suprax should be adjusted in patients with renal impairment as well as those undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and hemodialysis (HD). Patients on dialysis should be monitored carefully [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2)].

5.4 Coagulation Effects

Cephalosporins, including Suprax, may be associated with a fall in prothrombin activity. Those at risk include patients with renal or hepatic impairment, or poor nutritional state, as well as patients receiving a protracted course of antimicrobial therapy, and patients previously stabilized on anticoagulant therapy. Prothrombin time should be monitored in patients at risk and exogenous vitamin K administered as indicated.

5.5 Development of Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Prescribing Suprax (cefixime) in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection is unlikely to provide benefit to the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The most commonly seen adverse reactions in U.S. trials of the tablet formulation were gastrointestinal events, which were reported in 30% of adult patients on either the twice daily or the once daily regimen. Five percent (5%) of patients in the U.S. clinical trials discontinued therapy because of drug-related adverse reactions. Individual adverse reactions included diarrhea 16%, loose or frequent stools 6%, abdominal pain 3%, nausea 7%, dyspepsia 3%, and flatulence 4%. The incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reactions, including diarrhea and loose stools, in pediatric patients receiving the suspension was comparable to the incidence seen in adult patients receiving tablets.

6.2 Post-marketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been reported following the use of cefixime. Incidence rates were less than 1 in 50 (less than 2%).

Gastrointestinal

Several cases of documented pseudomembranous colitis were identified in clinical trials. The onset of pseudomembranous colitis symptoms may occur during or after therapy.

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (including shock and fatalities), skin rashes, urticaria, drug fever, pruritus, angioedema, and facial edema. Erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and serum sickness-like reactions have been reported.

Hepatic

Transient elevations in SGPT, SGOT, alkaline phosphatase, hepatitis, jaundice.

Renal

Transient elevations in BUN or creatinine, acute renal failure.

Central Nervous System

Headaches, dizziness, seizures.

Hemic and Lymphatic System

Transient thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, neutropenia, prolongation in prothrombin time, elevated LDH, pancytopenia, agranulocytosis, and eosinophilia.

Abnormal Laboratory Tests

Hyperbilirubinemia.

Other Adverse Reactions

Genital pruritus, vaginitis, candidiasis, toxic epidermal necrolysis.

Adverse Reactions Reported for Cephalosporin-class Drugs

Allergic reactions, superinfection, renal dysfunction, toxic nephropathy, hepatic dysfunction including cholestasis, aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, hemorrhage, and colitis.

Several cephalosporins have been implicated in triggering seizures, particularly in patients with renal impairment when the dosage was not reduced [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2) and OVERDOSAGE (10)]. If seizures associated with drug therapy occur, the drug should be discontinued. Anticonvulsant therapy can be given if clinically indicated.

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Carbamazepine

Elevated carbamazepine levels have been reported in postmarketing experience when cefixime is administered concomitantly. Drug monitoring may be of assistance in detecting alterations in carbamazepine plasma concentrations.

7.2 Warfarin and Anticoagulants

Increased prothrombin time, with or without clinical bleeding, has been reported when cefixime is administered concomitantly.

7.3 Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

A false-positive reaction for ketones in the urine may occur with tests using nitroprusside but not with those using nitroferricyanide.

The administration of cefixime may result in a false-positive reaction for glucose in the urine using Clinitest® **, Benedict’s solution, or Fehling’s solution. It is recommended that glucose tests based on enzymatic glucose oxidase reactions (such as Clinistix® ** or TesTape® **) be used. A false-positive direct Coombs test has been reported during treatment with other cephalosporins; therefore, it should be recognized that a positive Coombs test may be due to the drug.

**Clinitest® and Clinistix® are registered trademarks of Ames Division, Miles Laboratories, Inc. Tes-Tape® is a registered trademark of Eli Lilly and Company.

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