SUPRAX (Page 5 of 7)

12.4 Microbiology

Mechanism of Action

As with other cephalosporins, the bactericidal action of cefixime results from inhibition of cell wall synthesis. Cefixime is stable in the presence of certain beta-lactamase enzymes. As a result, certain organisms resistant to penicillins and some cephalosporins due to the presence of beta-lactamases may be susceptible to cefixime.

Resistance

Resistance to cefixime in isolates of Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae is most often associated with alterations in penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). Cefixime may have limited activity against Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). Pseudomonas species, Enterococcus species, strains of Group D streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, most strains of staphylococci (including methicillin-resistant strains), most strains of Enterobacter species, most strains of Bacteroides fragilis, and most strains of Clostridium species are resistant to cefixime.

Antimicrobial Activity

Cefixime has been shown to be active against most isolates of the following microorganisms, both in vitro and in clinical infections [see Indications and Usage (1)].

Gram-positive Bacteria

Streptococcus pneumoniae

Streptococcus pyogenes

Gram-negative Bacteria

Escherichia coli

Haemophilus influenzae

Moraxella catarrhalis

Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Proteus mirabilis

The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown. At least 90 percent of the following bacteria exhibit an in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) less than or equal to the susceptible breakpoint for cefixime against isolates of similar genus or organism group. However, the efficacy of cefixime in treating clinical infections caused by these bacteria has not been established in adequate and well-controlled clinical trials.

Gram-positive Bacteria

Streptococcus agalactiae

Gram-negative Bacteria

Citrobacter amalonaticus

Citrobacter diversus

Haemophilus parainfluenzae

Klebsiella oxytoca

Klebsiella pneumoniae

Pasteurella multocida

Proteus vulgaris

Providencia species

Salmonella species

Serratia marcescens

Shigella species

Susceptibility Testing

For specific information regarding susceptibility test interpretive criteria and associated test methods and quality control standards recognized by FDA for this drug, please see: https://www.fda.gov/STIC.

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Lifetime studies in animals to evaluate carcinogenic potential have not been conducted. Cefixime did not cause point mutations in bacteria or mammalian cells, DNA damage, or chromosome damage in vitro and did not exhibit clastogenic potential in vivo in the mouse micronucleus test. In rats, fertility and reproductive performance were not affected by cefixime at doses up to 25 times the adult therapeutic dose.

14 CLINICAL STUDIES

Comparative clinical trials of otitis media were conducted in nearly 400 children between the ages of 6 months to 10 years. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from 47% of the patients, Haemophilus influenzae from 34%, Moraxella catarrhalis from 15% and S. pyogenes from 4%.

The overall response rate of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cefixime was approximately 10% lower and that of Haemophilus influenzae or Moraxella catarrhalis approximately 7% higher (12% when beta-lactamase positive isolates of H. influenzae are included) than the response rates of these organisms to the active control drugs.

In these studies, patients were randomized and treated with either cefixime at dose regimens of 4 mg/kg twice a day or 8 mg/kg once a day, or with a comparator. Sixty-nine to 70% of the patients in each group had resolution of signs and symptoms of otitis media when evaluated 2 to 4 weeks post-treatment, but persistent effusion was found in 15% of the patients. When evaluated at the completion of therapy, 17% of patients receiving cefixime and 14% of patients receiving effective comparative drugs (18% including those patients who had Haemophilus influenzae resistant to the control drug and who received the control antibacterial drug) were considered to be treatment failures. By the 2 to 4 week follow-up, a total of 30%-31% of patients had evidence of either treatment failure or recurrent disease.

(a)Number eradicated/number isolated.

(b)An additional 20 beta-lactamase positive isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were isolated, but were excluded from this analysis because they were resistant to the control antibacterial drug. In nineteen of these, the clinical course could be assessed and a favorable outcome occurred in 10. When these cases are included in the overall bacteriological evaluation of therapy with the control drugs, 140/185 (76%) of pathogens were considered to be eradicated.

Bacteriological Outcome of Otitis Media at Two to Four Weeks Post Therapy Based on Repeat Middle Ear Fluid Culture or Extrapolation from Clinical Outcome
Organism Cefixime ( a ) 4 mg / kg BID Cefixime ( a ) 8 mg / kg QD Control ( a ) drugs
Streptococcus pneumoniae 48/70 (69%) 18/22 (82%) 82/100 (82%)
Haemophilus influenzae beta-lactamase negative 24/34 (71%) 13/17 (76%) 23/34 (68%)
Haemophilus influenzae beta-lactamase positive 17/22 (77%) 9/12 (75%) 1/1 (b)
Moraxella catarrhalis 26/31 (84%) 5/5 18/24 (75%)
S . pyogenes 5/5 3/3 6/7
All Isolates 120/162 (74%) 48/59 (81%) 130/166 (78%)

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