Tadalafil (Page 5 of 12)

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Tadalafil tablets are not indicated for use in females.

There are no data with the use of tadalafil tablets in pregnant women to inform any drug-associated risks for adverse developmental outcomes. In animal reproduction studies, no adverse developmental effects were observed with oral administration of tadalafil to pregnant rats or mice during organogenesis at exposures up to 11 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 20 mg/day (see Data).

Data

Animal Data

Animal reproduction studies showed no evidence of teratogenicity, embryotoxicity, or fetotoxicity when tadalafil was given orally to pregnant rats or mice at exposures up to 11 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 20 mg/day during organogenesis. In a prenatal/postnatal developmental study in rats, postnatal pup survival decreased following maternal exposure to tadalafil doses greater than 10 times the MRHD based on AUC. Signs of maternal toxicity occurred at doses greater than 16 times the MRHD based on AUC. Surviving offspring had normal development and reproductive performance.

In another rat prenatal and postnatal development study at doses of 60, 200, and 1000 mg/kg, a reduction in postnatal survival of pups was observed. The no observed effect level (NOEL) for maternal toxicity was 200 mg/kg/day and for developmental toxicity was 30 mg/kg/day. This gives approximately 16 and 10 fold exposure multiples, respectively, of the human AUC for the MRHD of 20 mg.

Tadalafil and/or its metabolites cross the placenta, resulting in fetal exposure in rats.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

Tadalafil tablets are not indicated for use in females.

There is no information on the presence of tadalafil and/or metabolites in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. Tadalafil and/or its metabolites are present in the milk of lactating rats at concentrations approximately 2.4-fold greater than found in the plasma.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Infertility

Based on the data from 3 studies in adult males, tadalafil decreased sperm concentrations in the study of 10 mg tadalafil for 6 months and the study of 20 mg tadalafil for 9 months. This effect was not seen in the study of 20 mg tadalafil taken for 6 months. There was no adverse effect of tadalafil 10 mg or 20 mg on mean concentrations of testosterone, luteinizing hormone or follicle stimulating hormone. The clinical significance of the decreased sperm concentrations in the two studies is unknown. There have been no studies evaluating the effect of tadalafil on fertility in men [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)].

Based on studies in animals, a decrease in spermatogenesis was observed in dogs, but not in rats [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

Tadalafil tablets are not indicated for use in pediatric patients. Safety and efficacy in patients below the age of 18 years have not been established.

Juvenile Animal Study
No adverse effects were observed in a study in which tadalafil was administered orally at doses of 60, 200, and 1000 mg/kg/day to juvenile rats on postnatal days 14 to 90. The highest plasma tadalafil exposures (AUC) achieved were approximately 10-fold that observed at the MRHD.
Additional information describing a clinical study in which efficacy was not demonstrated is approved for Eli Lilly and Company’s CIALIS (tadalafil) tablets. However, due to Eli Lilly and Company’s marketing exclusivity rights, this drug product is not labeled with that pediatric information.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Of the total number of subjects in ED clinical studies of tadalafil, approximately 19 percent were 65 and over, while approximately 2 percent were 75 and over. Of the total number of subjects in BPH clinical studies of tadalafil (including the ED/BPH study), approximately 40 percent were over 65, while approximately 10 percent were 75 and over. In these clinical trials, no overall differences in efficacy or safety were observed between older (>65 and ≥75 years of age) and younger subjects (≤65 years of age). However, in placebo-controlled studies with tadalafil tablets for use as needed for ED, diarrhea was reported more frequently in patients 65 years of age and older who were treated with tadalafil tablets (2.5% of patients) [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. No dose adjustment is warranted based on age alone. However, a greater sensitivity to medications in some older individuals should be considered [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8.6 Hepatic Impairment

In clinical pharmacology studies, tadalafil exposure (AUC) in subjects with mild or moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class A or B) was comparable to exposure in healthy subjects when a dose of 10 mg was administered. There are no available data for doses higher than 10 mg of tadalafil in patients with hepatic impairment. Insufficient data are available for subjects with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C) [see Dosage and Administration (2.6) and Warnings and Precautions (5.8)].

8.7 Renal Impairment

In clinical pharmacology studies using single-dose tadalafil (5 mg to 10 mg), tadalafil exposure (AUC) doubled in subjects with creatinine clearance 30mL/min. to 80 mL/min. In subjects with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis, there was a two-fold increase in Cmax and 2.7- to 4.8-fold increase in AUC following single-dose administration of 10 mg or 20 mg tadalafil. Exposure to total methylcatechol (unconjugated plus glucuronide) was 2- to 4-fold higher in subjects with renal impairment, compared to those with normal renal function. Hemodialysis (performed between 24 hours and 30 hours post-dose) contributed negligibly to tadalafil or metabolite elimination. In a clinical pharmacology study (N=28) at a dose of 10 mg, back pain was reported as a limiting adverse event in male patients with creatinine clearance 30 mL/min to 50 mL/min. At a dose of 5 mg, the incidence and severity of back pain was not significantly different than in the general population. In patients on hemodialysis taking 10-mg or 20-mg tadalafil, there were no reported cases of back pain [see Dosage and Administration (2.6) and Warnings and Precautions (5.7)].

10 OVERDOSAGE

Single doses up to 500 mg have been given to healthy subjects, and multiple daily doses up to 100 mg have been given to patients. Adverse events were similar to those seen at lower doses. In cases of overdose, standard supportive measures should be adopted as required. Hemodialysis contributes negligibly to tadalafil elimination.

11 DESCRIPTION

Tadalafil is a selective inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5).
Tadalafil has the empirical formula C22 H19 N3 O4 representing a molecular weight of 389.41. The structural formula is:

Structure

The chemical designation is pyrazino[1’,2’:1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indole-1,4-dione, 6-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2,3,6,7,12,12a-hexahydro-2-methyl-, (6R,12aR)-. It is a white to off white powder that is slightly soluble in dichloromethane and very slightly soluble in methanol.

Tadalafil tablets USP are available as round shaped tablets (2.5 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg) and oval shaped tablets (20 mg) for oral administration. Each tablet contains 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, or 20 mg of tadalafil and the following inactive ingredients: hydroxy propyl cellulose, lactose monohydrate, croscarmellose sodium, sodium lauryl sulphate, povidone k-25, colloidal silicone dioxide, magnesium stearate, hypromellose, titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol 6000, talc and iron oxide yellow.

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

12.1 Mechanism of Action

Penile erection during sexual stimulation is caused by increased penile blood flow resulting from the relaxation of penile arteries and corpus cavernosal smooth muscle. This response is mediated by the release of nitric oxide (NO) from nerve terminals and endothelial cells, which stimulates the synthesis of cGMP in smooth muscle cells. Cyclic GMP causes smooth muscle relaxation and increased blood flow into the corpus cavernosum. The inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) enhances erectile function by increasing the amount of cGMP. Tadalafil inhibits PDE5. Because sexual stimulation is required to initiate the local release of nitric oxide, the inhibition of PDE5 by tadalafil has no effect in the absence of sexual stimulation.

The effect of PDE5 inhibition on cGMP concentration in the corpus cavernosum and pulmonary arteries is also observed in the smooth muscle of the prostate, the bladder and their vascular supply. The mechanism for reducing BPH symptoms has not been established.

Studies in vitro have demonstrated that tadalafil is a selective inhibitor of PDE5. PDE5 is found in the smooth muscle of the corpus cavernosum, prostate, and bladder as well as in vascular and visceral smooth muscle, skeletal muscle, urethra, platelets, kidney, lung, cerebellum, heart, liver, testis, seminal vesicle, and pancreas.

In vitro studies have shown that the effect of tadalafil is more potent on PDE5 than on other phosphodiesterases. These studies have shown that tadalafil is >10,000-fold more potent for PDE5 than for PDE1, PDE2, PDE4, and PDE7 enzymes, which are found in the heart, brain, blood vessels, liver, leukocytes, skeletal muscle, and other organs. Tadalafil is >10,000-fold more potent for PDE5 than for PDE3, an enzyme found in the heart and blood vessels. Additionally, tadalafil is 700-fold more potent for PDE5 than for PDE6, which is found in the retina and is responsible for phototransduction. Tadalafil is >9,000-fold more potent for PDE5 than for PDE8, PDE9, and PDE10. Tadalafil is 14-fold more potent for PDE5 than for PDE11A1 and 40-fold more potent for PDE5 than for PDE11A4, two of the four known forms of PDE11. PDE11 is an enzyme found in human prostate, testes, skeletal muscle and in other tissues (e.g., adrenal cortex). In vitro, tadalafil inhibits human recombinant PDE11A1 and, to a lesser degree, PDE11A4 activities at concentrations within the therapeutic range. The physiological role and clinical consequence of PDE11 inhibition in humans have not been defined.

All MedLibrary.org resources are included in as near-original form as possible, meaning that the information from the original provider has been rendered here with only typographical or stylistic modifications and not with any substantive alterations of content, meaning or intent.

This site is provided for educational and informational purposes only, in accordance with our Terms of Use, and is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a medical doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner or other qualified health professional.

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2020. All Rights Reserved.