Tadalafil (Page 6 of 11)

7.3 Potential for Tadalafil to Affect Other Drugs

Aspirin — Tadalafil did not potentiate the increase in bleeding time caused by aspirin.

Cytochrome P450 Substrates — Tadalafil is not expected to cause clinically significant inhibition or induction of the clearance of drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms. Studies have shown that tadalafil does not inhibit or induce P450 isoforms CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1.

CYP1A2 (e.g. Theophylline) — Tadalafil had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of theophylline. When tadalafil was administered to subjects taking theophylline, a small augmentation (3 beats per minute) of the increase in heart rate associated with theophylline was observed.

CYP2C9 (e.g. Warfarin) — Tadalafil had no significant effect on exposure (AUC) to S-warfarin or R-warfarin, nor did tadalafil affect changes in prothrombin time induced by warfarin.

CYP3A4 (e.g. Midazolam or Lovastatin) — Tadalafil had no significant effect on exposure (AUC) to midazolam or lovastatin.

P-glycoprotein (e.g. Digoxin)— Coadministration of tadalafil (40 mg once per day) for 10 days did not have a significant effect on the steady-state pharmacokinetics of digoxin (0.25 mg/day) in healthy subjects.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Tadalafil tablets are not indicated for use in females. There are no data with the use of tadalafil in pregnant women to inform any drug-associated risks for adverse developmental outcomes. In animal reproduction studies, no adverse developmental effects were observed with oral administration of tadalafil to pregnant rats or mice during organogenesis at exposures up to 11 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 20 mg/day (see Data).

Data

Animal Data

Animal reproduction studies showed no evidence of teratogenicity, embryotoxicity, or fetotoxicity when tadalafil was given orally to pregnant rats or mice at exposures up to 11 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 20 mg/day during organogenesis. In a prenatal/postnatal developmental study in rats, postnatal pup survival decreased following maternal exposure to tadalafil doses greater than 10 times the MRHD based on AUC. Signs of maternal toxicity occurred at doses greater than 16 times the MRHD based on AUC. Surviving offspring had normal development and reproductive performance.

In another rat prenatal and postnatal development study at doses of 60, 200, and 1,000 mg/kg, a reduction in postnatal survival of pups was observed. The no observed effect level (NOEL) for maternal toxicity was 200 mg/kg/day and for developmental toxicity was 30 mg/kg/day. This gives approximately 16 and 10 fold exposure multiples, respectively, of the human AUC for the MRHD of 20 mg.

Tadalafil and/or its metabolites cross the placenta, resulting in fetal exposure in rats.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

Tadalafil tablets are not indicated for use in females. There is no information on the presence of tadalafil and/or metabolites in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. Tadalafil and/or its metabolites are present in the milk of lactating rats at concentrations approximately 2.4-fold greater than found in the plasma.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Infertility

Based on the data from 3 studies in adult males, tadalafil decreased sperm concentrations in the study of 10 mg tadalafil for 6 months and the study of 20 mg tadalafil for 9 months. This effect was not seen in the study of 20 mg tadalafil taken for 6 months. There was no adverse effect of tadalafil 10 mg or 20 mg on mean concentrations of testosterone, luteinizing hormone or follicle stimulating hormone. The clinical significance of the decreased sperm concentrations in the two studies is unknown. There have been no studies evaluating the effect of tadalafil on fertility in men [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.2)].

Based on studies in animals, a decrease in spermatogenesis was observed in dogs, but not in rats [see Nonclinical Toxicology ( 13.1)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

Tadalafil is not indicated for use in pediatric patients. Safety and efficacy in patients below the age of 18 years has not been established.

Juvenile Animal Study

No adverse effects were observed in a study in which tadalafil was administered orally at doses of 60, 200, and 1000 mg/kg/day to juvenile rats on postnatal days 14 to 90. The highest plasma tadalafil exposures (AUC) achieved were approximately 10-fold that observed at the MRHD.

Additional information describing a clinical study in which efficacy was not demonstrated is approved for Eli Lilly and Company’s CIALIS (tadalafil) tablets. However, due to Eli Lilly and Company’s marketing exclusivity rights, this drug product is not labeled with that pediatric information.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Of the total number of subjects in ED clinical studies of tadalafil, approximately 19 percent were 65 and over, while approximately 2 percent were 75 and over. Of the total number of subjects in BPH clinical studies of tadalafil (including the ED/BPH study), approximately 40 percent were over 65, while approximately 10 percent were 75 and over. In these clinical trials, no overall differences in efficacy or safety were observed between older (>65 and ≥75 years of age) and younger subjects (≤65 years of age). However, in placebo-controlled studies with tadalafil for use as needed for ED, diarrhea was reported more frequently in patients 65 years of age and older who were treated with tadalafil (2.5% of patients) [see Adverse Reactions ( 6.1)]. No dose adjustment is warranted based on age alone. However, a greater sensitivity to medications in some older individuals should be considered. [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)].

8.6 Hepatic Impairment

In clinical pharmacology studies, tadalafil exposure (AUC) in subjects with mild or moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class A or B) was comparable to exposure in healthy subjects when a dose of 10 mg was administered. There are no available data for doses higher than 10 mg of tadalafil in patients with hepatic impairment. Insufficient data are available for subjects with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C). [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.6) and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.8)].

8.7 Renal Impairment

In clinical pharmacology studies using single-dose tadalafil (5 to 10 mg), tadalafil exposure (AUC) doubled in subjects with creatinine clearance 30 to 80 mL/min. In subjects with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis, there was a two-fold increase in C max and 2.7- to 4.8-fold increase in AUC following single-dose administration of 10 or 20 mg tadalafil. Exposure to total methylcatechol (unconjugated plus glucuronide) was 2- to 4-fold higher in subjects with renal impairment, compared to those with normal renal function. Hemodialysis (performed between 24 and 30 hours post-dose) contributed negligibly to tadalafil or metabolite elimination. In a clinical pharmacology study (N=28) at a dose of 10 mg, back pain was reported as a limiting adverse event in male patients with creatinine clearance 30 to 50 mL/min. At a dose of 5 mg, the incidence and severity of back pain was not significantly different than in the general population. In patients on hemodialysis taking 10 or 20 mg tadalafil, there were no reported cases of back pain. [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.6) and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.7)].

10 OVERDOSAGE

Single doses up to 500 mg have been given to healthy subjects, and multiple daily doses up to 100 mg have been given to patients. Adverse events were similar to those seen at lower doses. In cases of overdose, standard supportive measures should be adopted as required. Hemodialysis contributes negligibly to tadalafil elimination.

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