Tranexamic Acid

TRANEXAMIC ACID- tranexamic acid injection, solution
X-GEN Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Antifibrinolytic agent

Rx only

DESCRIPTION

Each mL of the sterile solution for intravenous injection contains 100 mg tranexamic acid and Water for Injection to 1 mL.

FORMULATION

Chemical Name: trans-4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexanecarboxylic acid.

Structural Formula:

Structural Formula
(click image for full-size original)

Empirical Formula: C8 H15 NO2 Molecular Weight: 157.2

Tranexamic acid is a white crystalline powder. The aqueous solution for injection has a pH of 6.5 to 8.0.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Tranexamic acid is a competitive inhibitor of plasminogen activation, and at much higher concentrations, a noncompetitive inhibitor of plasmin, i.e., actions similar to aminocaproic acid. Tranexamic acid is about 10 times more potent in vitro than aminocaproic acid.

Tranexamic acid binds more strongly than aminocaproic acid to both the strong and weak receptor sites of the plasminogen molecule in a ratio corresponding to the difference in potency between the compounds. Tranexamic acid in a concentration of 1 mg per mL does not aggregate platelets in vitro.

Tranexamic acid in concentrations as low as 1 mg per mL can prolong the thrombin time. However, tranexamic acid in concentrations up to 10 mg per mL in blood showed no influence on the platelet count, the coagulation time, or other coagulation factors in whole blood or citrated blood from normal subjects.

The plasma protein binding of tranexamic acid is about 3% at therapeutic plasma levels and seems to be fully accounted for by its binding to plasminogen. Tranexamic acid does not bind to serum albumin.

After an intravenous dose of 1 g, the plasma concentration time curve shows a triexponential decay with a half-life of about 2 hours for the terminal elimination phase. The initial volume of distribution is about 9 to 12 liters. Urinary excretion is the main route of elimination via glomerular filtration. Overall renal clearance is equal to overall plasma clearance (110 to 116 mL/min) and more than 95% of the dose is excreted in the urine as the unchanged drug. Excretion of tranexamic acid is about 90% at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 10 mg per kg body weight.

An antifibrinolytic concentration of tranexamic acid remains in different tissues for about 17 hours, and in the serum, up to seven or eight hours.

Tranexamic acid passes through the placenta. The concentration in cord blood after an intravenous injection of 10 mg per kg to pregnant women is about 30 mg per liter, as high as in the maternal blood. Tranexamic acid diffuses rapidly into joint fluid and the synovial membrane. In the joint fluid the same concentration is obtained as in the serum. The biological half-life of tranexamic acid in the joint fluid is about three hours.

The concentration of tranexamic acid in a number of other tissues is lower than in blood. In breast milk the concentration is about one hundredth of the serum peak concentration. Tranexamic acid concentration in cerebrospinal fluid is about one tenth of that of the plasma. The drug passes into the aqueous humor, the concentration being about one tenth of the plasma concentration.

Tranexamic acid has been detected in semen where it inhibits fibrinolytic activity but does not influence sperm migration.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Tranexamic Acid Injection is indicated in patients with hemophilia for short-term use (two to eight days) to reduce or prevent hemorrhage and reduce the need for replacement therapy during and following tooth extraction.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Tranexamic Acid Injection is contraindicated:

1. In patients with acquired defective color vision, since this prohibits measuring one endpoint that should be followed as a measure of toxicity (see WARNINGS).

2. In patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Anecdotal experience indicates that cerebral edema and cerebral infarction may be caused by tranexamic acid in such patients.

3. In patients with active intravascular clotting.

4. In patients with hypersensitivity to tranexamic acid or any of the ingredients.

WARNINGS

Focal areas of retinal degeneration have developed in cats, dogs and rats following oral or intravenous tranexamic acid at doses between 250 to 1600 mg/kg/day (6 to 40 times the recommended usual human dose) from 6 days to 1 year. The incidence of such lesions has varied from 25% to 100% of animals treated and was dose-related. At lower doses some lesions have appeared to be reversible.

Limited data in cats and rabbits showed retinal changes in some animals with doses as low as 126 mg/kg/day (only about 3 times the recommended human dose) administered for several days to two weeks.

No retinal changes have been reported or noted in eye examinations in patients treated with tranexamic acid for weeks to months in clinical trials.

However, visual abnormalities, often poorly characterized, represent the most frequently reported postmarketing adverse reaction in Sweden. For patients who are to be treated continually for longer than several days, an ophthalmological examination, including visual acuity, color vision, eye-ground and visual fields, is advised, before commencing and at regular intervals during the course of treatment. Tranexamic acid should be discontinued if changes in examination results are found.

Convulsions have been reported in association with tranexamic acid treatment, particularly in patients receiving tranexamic acid during cardiovascular surgery and in patients inadvertently given tranexamic acid into the neuraxial system.

Cases of allergic reaction with use of intravenous tranexamic acid, including anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reaction have been reported that are suggestive of a causal relationship

PRECAUTIONS

General

The dose of tranexamic acid Injection should be reduced in patients with renal insufficiency because of the risk of accumulation (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

Ureteral obstruction due to clot formation in patients with upper urinary tract bleeding has been reported in patients treated with tranexamic acid.

Venous and arterial thrombosis or thromboembolism has been reported in patients treated with tranexamic acid. In addition, cases of central retinal artery and central retinal vein obstruction have been reported.

Patients with a previous history of thromboembolic disease may be at increased risk for venous or arterial thrombosis.

Tranexamic acid should not be administered concomitantly with Factor IX Complex concentrates or Anti-inhibitor Coagulant concentrates, as the risk of thrombosis may be increased.

Patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), who require treatment with tranexamic acid, must be under strict supervision of a physician experienced in treating this disorder.

Tranexamic may cause dizziness and therefore may influence the ability to drive or use machines.

Drug Interactions

No studies of interactions between Tranexamic Acid Injection and other drugs have been conducted.

Carcinogenesis, Mmutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

An increased incidence of leukemia in male mice receiving tranexamic acid in food at a concentration of 4.8% (equivalent to doses as high as 5 g/kg/day) may have been related to treatment. Female mice were not included in this experiment.

Hyperplasia of the biliary tract and cholangioma and adenocarcinoma of the intrahepatic biliary system have been reported in one strain of rats after dietary administration of doses exceeding the maximum tolerated dose for 22 months. Hyperplastic, but not neoplastic, lesions were reported at lower doses. Subsequent long-term dietary administration studies in a different strain of rat, each with an exposure level equal to the maximum level employed in the earlier experiment, have failed to show such hyperplastic/neoplastic changes in the liver. No mutagenic activity has been demonstrated in several in vitro and in vivo test systems.

There are no clinical or nonclinical data to assess the effects of tranexamic acid on fertility.

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