Trihexyphenidyl Hydrochloride

TRIHEXYPHENIDYL HYDROCHLORIDE — trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride tablet
Pack Pharmaceuticals, LLC

RX Only

DESCRIPTION

Trihexyphenidyl HCl is a synthetic antispasmodic drug. It is designated chemically as α-Cyclohexylα-phenyl-1-piperidinepropanol hydrochloride and its structural formula is as follows:

trihexyphenidyl HCl chemical structure
(click image for full-size original)

C20 H31 NO HCl M.W.337.93

Trihexyphenidyl HCl occurs as a white or creamy-white, almost odorless, crystalline powder. It is very slightly soluble in ether and benzene, slightly soluble in water and soluble in methanol.

Trihexyphenidyl Hydrochloride Tablets USP 2 mg and 5 mg contain the following inactive ingredients: magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose and sodium starch glycolate.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Trihexyphenidyl HCl exerts a direct inhibitory effect upon the parasympathetic nervous system. It also has a relaxing effect on smooth musculature; exerted both directly upon the muscle tissue itself and indirectly through an inhibitory effect upon the parasympathetic nervous system. Its therapeutic properties are similar to those of atropine although undesirable side effects are ordinarily less frequent and severe than with the latter.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Trihexyphenidyl HCl is indicated as an adjunct in the treatment of all forms of parkinsonism (postencephalitic, arteriosclerotic, and idiopathic). It is often useful as adjuvant therapy when treating these forms of parkinsonism with levodopa. Additionally, it is indicated for the control of extrapyramidal disorders caused by central nervous system drugs such as the dibenzoxazepines, phenothiazines, thioxanthenes, and butyrophenones.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Trihexyphenidyl HCl is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to trihexyphenidyl HCl orto any of the tablet ingredients. Trihexyphenidyl HCl is also contraindicated in patients with narrow angle glaucoma. Blindness after long-term use due to narrow angle glaucoma has been reported.

WARNINGS

Patients to be treated with trihexyphenidyl HCl should have a gonioscope evaluation prior to initiation of therapy and close monitoring of intraocular pressures. The use of anticholinergic drugs may precipitate angle closure with an increase in intraocular pressure. If blurring of vision occurs during therapy, the possibility of narrow angle glaucoma should be considered. Blindness has been reported due to aggravation of narrow angle glaucoma (see CONTRAINDICATIONS and ADVERSE REACTIONS).Trihexyphenidyl HCl should be administered with caution in hot weather, especially when given concomitantly with other atropine-like drugs to the chronically ill, alcoholics, those who have central nervous system disease, or those who do manual labor in a hot environment. Anhidrosis may occur more readily when some disturbance of sweating already exists. If there is evidence of anhidrosis, the possibility of hyperthermia should be considered. Dosage should be decreased so that the ability to maintain body heat equilibrium via perspiration is not impaired. Severe anhidrosis and fatal hyperthermia have occurred with the use of anticholinergics under the conditions described above.

Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

A potentially fatal symptom complex sometimes referred to as Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) has been reported in association with dose reduction or discontinuation of trihexyphenidyl. Clinical manifestations of NMS are hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, altered mental status and evidence of autonomic instability (irregular pulse or blood pressure, tachycardia, diaphoresis and cardiac dysrhythmias).

The diagnostic evaluation of patients with this syndrome is complicated. In arriving at a diagnosis, it is important to identify cases where the clinical presentation includes both serious medical illness (eg, pneumonia, systemic infection, etc.) and untreated or inadequately treated extrapyramidal signs and symptoms (EPS). Other important considerations in the differential diagnosis include central anticholinergic toxicity, heat stroke, drug fever, and primary central nervous system (CNS) pathology.

PRECAUTIONS

General

Patients with cardiac, liver, or kidney disorders, or with hypertension, should be closely monitored.

Since trihexyphenidyl HCl has atropine-like properties, patients on long-term treatment should be carefully monitored for untoward reactions.

Tardive dyskinesia may appear in some patients on long-term therapy with antipsychotic drugs or may occur after therapy with these drugs has been discontinued. Antiparkinsonism agents do not alleviate the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia, and in some instances may aggravate them.

However, parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia often coexist in patients receiving chronic neuroleptic treatment, and anticholinergic therapy with trihexyphenidyl HCl may relieve some of these parkinsonism symptoms. Trihexyphenidyl HCl is not recommended for use in patients with tardive dyskinesia unless they have concomitant Parkinson’s disease.

Patients with arteriosclerosis or with a history of idiosyncrasy to other drugs may exhibit reactions of mental confusion, agitation, disturbed behavior, or nausea and vomiting. Such patients should be allowed to develop a tolerance through the initial administration of a small dose and gradual increase in dose until an effective level is reached. If a severe reaction should occur, administration of the drug should be discontinued for a few days and then resumed at a lower dosage. Psychiatric disturbances can result from indiscriminate use (leading to overdosage) to sustain continued euphoria. ( See DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE.)

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

Information for Patients

Trihexyphenidyl HCl may impair mental and/or physical abilities required for performance of hazardous tasks, such as operating machinery or driving a motor vehicle. Patients should be cautioned about operating machinery, including automobiles, until they are reasonably certain that trihexyphenidyl HCl therapy does not adversely affect their ability to engage in such activities.

Because of increased sedative effects, patients should be cautioned to avoid the use of alcohol or other CNS depressants while taking trihexyphenidyl HCl.

( See WARNINGS.)

Patients should be advised to report the occurrence of Gl problems, fever, or heat intolerance promptly since paralytic ileus, hyperthermia, or heat stroke may occur.

If GI upset occurs, trihexyphenidyl HCl may be taken with food.

( See WARNINGS.)

Drug Interactions

Cannabinoids, barbiturates, opiates, and alcohol may have additive effects with trihexyphenidyl HCl, and thus, an abuse potential exists.

Concurrent use of alcohol or other CNS depressants with trihexyphenidyl HCl may cause increased sedative effects.

Monoamine oxidase inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants possessing significant anticholinergic activity may intensify the anticholinergic effects of antidyskinetic agents because of the secondary anticholinergic activities of these medications.

Prophylactic administration of anticholinergic agents, such as trihexyphenidyl, as a prevention of drug-induced parkinsonism during neuroleptic therapy is not recommended. There may be an increased risk for the development of tardive dyskinesia during concomitant administration of anticholinergics and neuroleptics ( see PRECAUTIONS, General).

The usual dose of either trihexyphenidyl or levodopa may need to be reduced during concomitant therapy, since concomitant administration may increase drug-induced involuntary movements ( see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility

No carcinogenicity studies or adequate genotoxicity or fertility studies have been conducted for trihexyphenidyl HCl.

Pregnancy

TERATOGENIC EFFECTS PREGNANCY CATEGORY C

Animal reproduction studies to evaluate teratogenic and embryotoxic potential have not been conducted with trihexyphenidyl HCl. It is also not known whether trihexyphenidyl HCl can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity. Trihexyphenidyl HCl should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

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