ULORIC

ULORIC- febuxostat tablet
Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.

WARNING: CARDIOVASCULAR DEATH

Gout patients with established cardiovascular (CV) disease treated with ULORIC had a higher rate of CV death compared to those treated with allopurinol in a CV outcomes study [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

Consider the risks and benefits of ULORIC when deciding to prescribe or continue patients on ULORIC. ULORIC should only be used in patients who have an inadequate response to a maximally titrated dose of allopurinol, who are intolerant to allopurinol, or for whom treatment with allopurinol is not advisable [see Indications and Usage (1)].

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

ULORIC is a xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor indicated for the chronic management of hyperuricemia in adult patients with gout who have an inadequate response to a maximally titrated dose of allopurinol, who are intolerant to allopurinol, or for whom treatment with allopurinol is not advisable.

For the safe and effective use of allopurinol, see allopurinol prescribing information.

Limitations of Use:

ULORIC is not recommended for the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia.

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

2.1 Recommended Dose

The recommended ULORIC dosage is 40 mg or 80 mg once daily.

The recommended starting dosage of ULORIC is 40 mg once daily. For patients who do not achieve a serum uric acid (sUA) less than 6 mg/dL after two weeks, the recommended ULORIC dosage is 80 mg once daily.

ULORIC can be taken without regard to food or antacid use [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

2.2 Dosage Recommendations in Patients with Renal Impairment and Hepatic Impairment

No dose adjustment is necessary when administering ULORIC in patients with mild or moderate renal impairment.

The recommended dosage of ULORIC is limited to 40 mg once daily in patients with severe renal impairment [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

No dose adjustment is necessary in patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment [see Use in Specific Populations (8.7) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

2.3 Uric Acid Level

Testing for the target serum uric acid level of less than 6 mg/dL may be performed as early as two weeks after initiating ULORIC therapy.

2.4 Recommended Prophylaxis for Gout Flares

Gout flares may occur after initiation of ULORIC due to changing serum uric acid levels resulting in mobilization of urate from tissue deposits. Flare prophylaxis with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or colchicine is recommended upon initiation of ULORIC. Prophylactic therapy may be beneficial for up to six months [see Clinical Studies (14.1)].

If a gout flare occurs during ULORIC treatment, ULORIC need not be discontinued. The gout flare should be managed concurrently, as appropriate for the individual patient [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

  • 40 mg tablets, light green to green, round, debossed with “TAP” and “40″
  • 80 mg tablets, light green to green, teardrop shaped, debossed with “TAP” and “80″

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

ULORIC is contraindicated in patients being treated with azathioprine or mercaptopurine [see Drug Interactions (7)].

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Cardiovascular Death

In a cardiovascular (CV) outcome study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01101035), gout patients with established CV disease treated with ULORIC had a higher rate of CV death compared to those treated with allopurinol. The CV outcomes study in patients with gout (CARES) was a randomized, double-blinded, allopurinol-controlled, non-inferiority study conducted to evaluate the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with gout who were treated with ULORIC. The study enrolled patients who had a history of major CV disease, cerebrovascular disease or diabetes mellitus with micro- and/or macrovascular disease. The primary endpoint was the time to first occurrence of MACE defined as the composite of CV death, nonfatal MI, nonfatal stroke, or unstable angina with urgent coronary revascularization. The study was designed to exclude a prespecified risk margin of 1.3 for the hazard ratio of MACE. Results showed that ULORIC was non-inferior to allopurinol for the primary endpoint of MACE [Hazard Ratio: 1.03, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.89, 1.21]. However, there was a significant increase in CV deaths in patients treated with ULORIC (134 [1.5 per 100 patient-years]) compared to patients treated with allopurinol (100 [1.1 per 100 patient-years]) [Hazard Ratio: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.73]. Sudden cardiac death was the most common cause of adjudicated CV deaths in the ULORIC group (83 of 3,098; 2.7%) as compared to the allopurinol group (56 of 3,092; 1.8%). ULORIC was similar to allopurinol for nonfatal MI, nonfatal stroke and unstable angina with urgent coronary revascularization [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

Because of the increased risk of CV death, ULORIC should only be used in patients who have an inadequate response to a maximally titrated dose of allopurinol, who are intolerant to allopurinol, or for whom treatment with allopurinol is not advisable [see Indications and Usage(1)].

Consider the risks and benefits of ULORIC when deciding to prescribe or continue patients on ULORIC [see Indications and Usage (1)]. Consider use of prophylactic low-dose aspirin therapy in patients with a history of CV disease. Physicians and patients should remain alert for the development of adverse CV event signs and symptoms. Patients should be informed about the symptoms of serious CV events and the steps to take if they occur.

5.2 Gout Flares

After initiation of ULORIC, an increase in gout flares is frequently observed. This increase is due to reduction in serum uric acid levels, resulting in mobilization of urate from tissue deposits.

In order to prevent gout flares when ULORIC is initiated, concurrent prophylactic treatment with an NSAID or colchicine is recommended [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)].

5.3 Hepatic Effects

There have been postmarketing reports of fatal and nonfatal hepatic failure in patients taking ULORIC, although the reports contain insufficient information necessary to establish the probable cause. During randomized controlled studies, transaminase elevations greater than three times the upper limit of normal (ULN) were observed (AST: 2%, 2%, and ALT: 3%, 2% in ULORIC and allopurinol-treated patients, respectively). No dose-effect relationship for these transaminase elevations was noted [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Obtain a liver test panel (serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin) as a baseline before initiating ULORIC.

Measure liver tests promptly in patients who report symptoms that may indicate liver injury, including fatigue, anorexia, right upper abdominal discomfort, dark urine or jaundice. In this clinical context, if the patient is found to have abnormal liver tests (ALT greater than three times the upper limit of the reference range), ULORIC treatment should be interrupted and investigation done to establish the probable cause. ULORIC should not be restarted in these patients without another explanation for the liver test abnormalities.

Patients who have serum ALT greater than three times the reference range with serum total bilirubin greater than two times the reference range without alternative etiologies are at risk for severe drug-induced liver injury and should not be restarted on ULORIC. For patients with lesser elevations of serum ALT or bilirubin and with an alternate probable cause, treatment with ULORIC can be used with caution.

5.4 Serious Skin Reactions

Postmarketing reports of serious skin and hypersensitivity reactions, including Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) have been reported in patients taking ULORIC. Discontinue ULORIC if serious skin reactions are suspected [see Patient Counseling Information (17)]. Many of these patients had reported previous similar skin reactions to allopurinol. ULORIC should be used with caution in these patients.

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