ULTRACET (Page 4 of 6)

Geriatric Use

In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function; of concomitant disease; and multiple drug therapy.

Acute Abdominal Conditions

The administration of ULTRACET® may complicate the clinical assessment of patients with acute abdominal conditions.

Use in Renal Disease

ULTRACET® has not been studied in patients with impaired renal function. Experience with tramadol suggests that impaired renal function results in a decreased rate and extent of excretion of tramadol and its active metabolite, M1. In patients with creatinine clearances of less than 30 mL/min, it is recommended that the dosing interval of ULTRACET® be increased, not to exceed 2 tablets every 12 hours.

Use in Hepatic Disease

ULTRACET® has not been studied in patients with impaired hepatic function. The use of ULTRACET® in patients with hepatic impairment is not recommended (see WARNINGS, Use With Alcohol).

Information for Patients

  • Do not take ULTRACET® if you are allergic to any of its ingredients.
  • If you develop signs of allergy such as a rash or difficulty breathing, stop taking ULTRACET® and contact your healthcare provider immediately.
  • Do not take more than 4,000 milligrams of acetaminophen per day. Call your doctor if you took more than the recommended dose.
  • Do not take ULTRACET® in combination with other tramadol or acetaminophen-containing products, including over-the-counter preparations.
  • ULTRACET® may cause seizures and/or serotonin syndrome with concomitant use of serotonergic agents (including SSRIs, SNRIs, and triptans) or drugs that significantly reduce the metabolic clearance of tramadol.
  • ULTRACET® may impair mental or physical abilities required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks such as driving a car or operating machinery.
  • ULTRACET® should not be taken concomitantly with alcohol-containing beverages during the course of treatment with ULTRACET®.
  • ULTRACET® should be used with caution when taking medications such as tranquilizers, hypnotics, or other opiate-containing analgesics.
  • Inform the physician if you are pregnant, think you might become pregnant, or are trying to become pregnant (see PRECAUTIONS, Labor and Delivery).
  • Understand the single-dose and 24-hour dose limit and the time interval between doses, since exceeding these recommendations can result in respiratory depression, seizures, hepatic toxicity, and death.

Drug Interactions

CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 Inhibitors

Concomitant administration of CYP2D6 and/or CYP3A4 inhibitors (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, Pharmacokinetics), such as quinidine, fluoxetine, paroxetine. and amitriptyline (CYP2D6 inhibitors), and ketoconazole and erythromycin (CYP3A4 inhibitors), may reduce metabolic clearance of tramadol, increasing the risk for serious adverse events including seizures and serotonin syndrome.

Serotonergic Drugs

There have been postmarketing reports of serotonin syndrome with use of tramadol and SSRIs/SNRIs or MAOIs and α2-adrenergic blockers. Caution is advised when ULTRACET® is coadministered with other drugs that may affect the serotonergic neurotransmitter systems, such as SSRIs, MAOIs, triptans, linezolid (an antibiotic which is a reversible non-selective MAOI), lithium, or St. John’s Wort. If concomitant treatment of ULTRACET® with a drug affecting the serotonergic neurotransmitter system is clinically warranted, careful observation of the patient is advised, particularly during treatment initiation and dose increases (see WARNINGS, Serotonin Syndrome).

Triptans

Based on the mechanism of action of tramadol and the potential for serotonin syndrome, caution is advised when ULTRACET® is coadministered with a triptan. If concomitant treatment of ULTRACET® with a triptan is clinically warranted, careful observation of the patient is advised, particularly during treatment initiation and dose increases (see WARNINGS, Serotonin Syndrome).

Use With Carbamazepine

Patients taking carbamazepine may have a significantly reduced analgesic effect of tramadol. Because carbamazepine increases tramadol metabolism and because of the seizure risk associated with tramadol, concomitant administration of ULTRACET® and carbamazepine is not recommended.

Use With Quinidine

Tramadol is metabolized to M1 by CYP2D6. Quinidine is a selective inhibitor of that isoenzyme; so that concomitant administration of quinidine and tramadol results in increased concentrations of tramadol and reduced concentrations of M1. The clinical consequences of these findings are unknown. In vitro drug interaction studies in human liver microsomes indicate that tramadol has no effect on quinidine metabolism.

Potential for Other Drugs to Affect Tramadol

In vitro drug interaction studies in human liver microsomes indicate that concomitant administration with inhibitors of CYP2D6 such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, and amitriptyline could result in some inhibition of the metabolism of tramadol. Administration of CYP3A4 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole and erythromycin, or inducers, such as rifampin and St. John’s Wort, with ULTRACET® may affect the metabolism of tramadol, leading to altered tramadol exposure.

Potential for Tramadol to Affect Other Drugs

In vitro studies indicate that tramadol is unlikely to inhibit the CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of other drugs when tramadol is administered concomitantly at therapeutic doses. Tramadol does not appear to induce its own metabolism in humans, since observed maximal plasma concentrations after multiple oral doses are higher than expected based on single-dose data. Tramadol is a mild inducer of selected drug metabolism pathways measured in animals.

Use With Cimetidine

Concomitant administration of ULTRACET® and cimetidine has not been studied. Concomitant administration of tramadol and cimetidine does not result in clinically significant changes in tramadol pharmacokinetics. Therefore, no alteration of the ULTRACET® dosage regimen is recommended.

Use With Digoxin

Post-marketing surveillance of tramadol has revealed rare reports of digoxin toxicity.

Use With Warfarin-Like Compounds

Post-marketing surveillance of both tramadol and acetaminophen individual products have revealed rare alterations of warfarin effect, including elevation of prothrombin times.

While such changes have been generally of limited clinical significance for the individual products, periodic evaluation of prothrombin time should be performed when ULTRACET® and warfarin-like compounds are administered concurrently.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

There are no animal or laboratory studies on the combination product (tramadol and acetaminophen) to evaluate carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, or impairment of fertility.

A slight but statistically significant increase in two common murine tumors, pulmonary and hepatic, was observed in a mouse carcinogenicity study, particularly in aged mice. Mice were dosed orally up to 30 mg/kg (90 mg/m2 or 0.5 times the maximum daily human tramadol dosage of 185 mg/m2) for approximately two years, although the study was not done with the Maximum Tolerated Dose. This finding is not believed to suggest risk in humans. No such finding occurred in a rat carcinogenicity study (dosing orally up to 30 mg/kg, 180 mg/m2 , or 1 time the maximum daily human tramadol dosage).

Tramadol was not mutagenic in the following assays: Ames Salmonella microsomal activation test, CHO/HPRT mammalian cell assay, mouse lymphoma assay (in the absence of metabolic activation), dominant lethal mutation tests in mice, chromosome aberration test in Chinese hamsters, and bone marrow micronucleus tests in mice and Chinese hamsters. Weakly mutagenic results occurred in the presence of metabolic activation in the mouse lymphoma assay and micronucleus test in rats. Overall, the weight of evidence from these tests indicates that tramadol does not pose a genotoxic risk to humans.

No effects on fertility were observed for tramadol at oral dose levels up to 50 mg/kg (350 mg/m2) in male rats and 75 mg/kg (450 mg/m2) in female rats. These dosages are 1.6 and 2.4 times the maximum daily human tramadol dosage of 185 mg/m2.

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

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