Venlafaxine Hydrochloride (Page 4 of 15)

5.6 Activation of Mania/Hypomania

Mania or hypomania was reported in venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules treated patients in the premarketing studies in MDD, SAD, and PD (see Table 2). Mania/hypomania has also been reported in a small proportion of patients with mood disorders who were treated with other marketed drugs to treat MDD. Venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules should be used cautiously in patients with a history of mania or hypomania.

Table 2: Incidence (%) of Mania or Hypomania Reported in Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Capsules Treated Patients in the Premarketing Studies
Indication Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Capsules Placebo
MDD 0.3 0
GAD 0 0.2
SAD 0.2 0
PD 0.1 0

5.7 Discontinuation Syndrome

Discontinuation symptoms have been systematically evaluated in patients taking venlafaxine, including prospective analyses of clinical studies in GAD and retrospective surveys of studies in MDD and SAD. Abrupt discontinuation or dose reduction of venlafaxine at various doses has been found to be associated with the appearance of new symptoms, the frequency of which increased with increased dose level and with longer duration of treatment. Reported symptoms include agitation, anorexia, anxiety, confusion, impaired coordination and balance, diarrhea, dizziness, dry mouth, dysphoric mood, fasciculation, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, headaches, hypomania, insomnia, nausea, nervousness, nightmares, sensory disturbances (including shock-like electrical sensations), somnolence, sweating, tremor, vertigo, and vomiting.

During marketing of venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules, other SNRIs, and SSRIs, there have been spontaneous reports of adverse events occurring upon discontinuation of these drugs, particularly when abrupt, including the following: dysphoric mood, irritability, agitation, dizziness, sensory disturbances (e.g., paresthesia, such as electric shock sensations), anxiety, confusion, headache, lethargy, emotional lability, insomnia, hypomania, tinnitus, and seizures. While these events are generally self-limiting, there have been reports of serious discontinuation symptoms.

Patients should be monitored for these symptoms when discontinuing treatment with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules. A gradual reduction in the dose, rather than abrupt cessation, is recommended whenever possible. If intolerable symptoms occur following a decrease in the dose or upon discontinuation of treatment, then resuming the previously prescribed dose may be considered. Subsequently, the physician may continue decreasing the dose, but at a more gradual rate [see Dosage and Administration (2.8)] .

5.8 Seizures

Seizures have occurred with venlafaxine therapy. Venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules, like many antidepressants, should be used cautiously in patients with a history of seizures and should be discontinued in any patient who develops seizures. [Must mitigate the risk: Risk factors, concomitant meds that lower the seizure threshold.]

5.9 Hyponatremia

Hyponatremia can occur as a result of treatment with SSRIs and SNRIs, including venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules. In many cases, the hyponatremia appears to be the result of the Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone (SIADH) secretion. Cases with serum sodium lower than 110 mmol/L have been reported. Elderly patients may be at greater risk of developing hyponatremia with SSRIs and SNRIs [see Use in Specific Populations (8.5)] . Also, patients taking diuretics, or those who are otherwise volume-depleted, may be at greater risk. Consider discontinuation of venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules in patients with symptomatic hyponatremia, and institute appropriate medical intervention.

Signs and symptoms of hyponatremia include headache, difficulty concentrating, memory impairment, confusion, weakness, and unsteadiness, which may lead to falls. Signs and symptoms associated with more severe and/or acute cases have included hallucination, syncope, seizure, coma, respiratory arrest, and death.

5.10 Weight and Height Changes in Pediatric Patients

Weight Changes

The average change in body weight and incidence of weight loss (percentage of patients who lost 3.5% or more) in the placebo-controlled pediatric studies in MDD, GAD, and SAD are shown in Tables 3 and 4.

Table 3: Average Change in Body Weight (kg) From Beginning of Treatment in Pediatric Patients in Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Studies of Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Capsules
Indication (Duration) Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Capsules Placebo
MDD and GAD (4 pooled studies, 8 weeks) -0.45 (n = 333) +0.77 (n = 333)
SAD (16 weeks) -0.75 (n = 137) +0.76 (n = 148)
Table 4: Incidence (%) of Pediatric Patients Experiencing Weight Loss (3.5% or more) in Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Studies of Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Capsules
a p < 0.001 versus placebo
Indication (Duration) Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Capsules Placebo
MDD and GAD (4 pooled studies, 8 weeks) 18 a (n = 333) 3.6 (n = 333)
SAD (16 weeks) 47 a (n = 137) 14 (n = 148)

Weight loss was not limited to patients with treatment-emergent anorexia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.11)] .

The risks associated with longer term venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules use were assessed in an open-label MDD study of children and adolescents who received venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules for up to six months. The children and adolescents in the study had increases in weight that were less than expected, based on data from age- and sex-matched peers. The difference between observed weight gain and expected weight gain was larger for children (< 12 years old) than for adolescents (≥ 12 years old).

Height Changes

Table 5 shows the average height increase in pediatric patients in the short-term, placebo-controlled MDD, GAD, and SAD studies. The differences in height increases in GAD and MDD studies were most notable in patients younger than twelve.

Table 5: Average Height Increases (cm) in Pediatric Patients in Placebo-controlled Studies of Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Capsules
a p = 0.041
Indication (Duration) Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Capsules Placebo
MDD (8 weeks) 0.8 (n = 146) 0.7 (n = 147)
GAD (8 weeks) 0.3 a (n = 122) 1 (n = 132)
SAD (16 weeks) 1 (n = 109) 1 (n = 112)

In the six-month, open-label MDD study, children and adolescents had height increases that were less than expected, based on data from age- and sex-matched peers. The difference between observed and expected growth rates was larger for children (< 12 years old) than for adolescents (≥ 12 years old).

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