Warfarin Sodium (Page 5 of 10)

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

Warfarin was not present in human milk from mothers treated with warfarin from a limited published study. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions, including bleeding in a breastfed infant, consider the developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding along with the mother’s clinical need for warfarin sodium and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from warfarin sodium or from the underlying maternal condition before prescribing warfarin sodium to a lactating woman.

Clinical Considerations

Monitor breastfeeding infants for bruising or bleeding.

Data

Human Data

Based on published data in 15 nursing mothers, warfarin was not detected in human milk. Among the 15 full-term newborns, 6 nursing infants had documented prothrombin times within the expected range. Prothrombin times were not obtained for the other 9 nursing infants. Effects in premature infants have not been evaluated.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Pregnancy Testing

Warfarin sodium can cause fetal harm [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)].

Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiating warfarin sodium therapy.

Contraception

Females

Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 1 month after the final dose of warfarin sodium.

8.4 Pediatric Use

Adequate and well-controlled studies with warfarin sodium have not been conducted in any pediatric population, and the optimum dosing, safety, and efficacy in pediatric patients is unknown. Pediatric use of warfarin sodium is based on adult data and recommendations, and available limited pediatric data from observational studies and patient registries. Pediatric patients administered warfarin sodium should avoid any activity or sport that may result in traumatic injury.

The developing hemostatic system in infants and children results in a changing physiology of thrombosis and response to anticoagulants. Dosing of warfarin in the pediatric population varies by patient age, with infants generally having the highest, and adolescents having the lowest milligram per kilogram dose requirements to maintain target INRs. Because of changing warfarin requirements due to age, concomitant medications, diet, and existing medical condition, target INR ranges may be difficult to achieve and maintain in pediatric patients, and more frequent INR determinations are recommended. Bleeding rates varied by patient population and clinical care center in pediatric observational studies and patient registries.

Infants and children receiving vitamin K-supplemented nutrition, including infant formulas, may be resistant to warfarin therapy, while human milk-fed infants may be sensitive to warfarin therapy.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Of the total number of patients receiving warfarin sodium in controlled clinical trials for which data were available for analysis, 1885 patients (24.4%) were 65 years and older, while 185 patients (2.4%) were 75 years and older. No overall differences in effectiveness or safety were observed between these patients and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

Patients 60 years or older appear to exhibit greater than expected INR response to the anticoagulant effects of warfarin [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Warfarin sodium is contraindicated in any unsupervised patient with senility. Conduct more frequent monitoring for bleeding with administration of warfarin sodium to elderly patients in any situation or with any physical condition where added risk of hemorrhage is present. Consider lower initiation and maintenance doses of warfarin sodium in elderly patients [see Dosage and Administration (2.2, 2.3)].

8.6 Renal Impairment

Renal clearance is considered to be a minor determinant of anticoagulant response to warfarin. No dosage adjustment is necessary for patients with renal impairment. Instruct patients with renal impairment taking warfarin to monitor their INR more frequently [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

Hepatic impairment can potentiate the response to warfarin through impaired synthesis of clotting factors and decreased metabolism of warfarin. Conduct more frequent monitoring for bleeding when using warfarin sodium in these patients.

10 OVERDOSAGE

10.1 Signs and Symptoms

Bleeding (e.g., appearance of blood in stools or urine, hematuria, excessive menstrual bleeding, melena, petechiae, excessive bruising or persistent oozing from superficial injuries, unexplained fall in hemoglobin) is a manifestation of excessive anticoagulation.

10.2 Treatment

The treatment of excessive anticoagulation is based on the level of the INR, the presence or absence of bleeding, and clinical circumstances. Reversal of warfarin sodium anticoagulation may be obtained by discontinuing warfarin sodium therapy and, if necessary, by administration of oral or parenteral vitamin K1 .

The use of vitamin K1 reduces response to subsequent warfarin sodium therapy and patients may return to a pretreatment thrombotic status following the rapid reversal of a prolonged INR. Resumption of warfarin sodium administration reverses the effect of vitamin K, and a therapeutic INR can again be obtained by careful dosage adjustment. If rapid re-anticoagulation is indicated, heparin may be preferable for initial therapy.

Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), fresh frozen plasma, or activated Factor VII treatment may be considered if the requirement to reverse the effects of warfarin sodium is urgent. A risk of hepatitis and other viral diseases is associated with the use of blood products; PCC and activated Factor VII are also associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Therefore, these preparations should be used only in exceptional or life-threatening bleeding episodes secondary to warfarin sodium overdosage.

11 DESCRIPTION

Crystalline warfarin sodium is an anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. The chemical name of warfarin sodium is 3-(α-acetonylbenzyl)-4-hydroxycoumarin sodium salt, which is a racemic mixture of the R — and S -enantiomers. Crystalline warfarin sodium is an isopropanol clathrate. Its empirical formula is C19 H15 NaO4 , and its structural formula is represented by the following:

474ff828-figure-01
(click image for full-size original)

Crystalline warfarin sodium occurs as a white, odorless, crystalline powder that is discolored by light. It is very soluble in water, freely soluble in alcohol, and very slightly soluble in chloroform and ether.

Warfarin sodium tablets, USP (Crystalline) for oral use also contain:

All strengths: Hydroxypropyl Cellulose, Lactose Monohydrate, Magnesium Stearate and Pregelatinized Starch

1 mg: D&C Red No. 6 Barium Lake

2 mg: FD&C Blue No. 2 Aluminum Lake and FD&C Red No. 40 Aluminum Lake

2-1/2 mg: D&C Yellow No. 10 Aluminum Lake and FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake

3 mg: FD&C Yellow No. 6 Aluminum Lake, FD&C Blue No. 2 Aluminum Lake, and FD&C Red No. 40 Aluminum Lake

4 mg: FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake

5 mg: FD&C Yellow No. 6 Aluminum Lake

6 mg: FD&C Yellow No. 6 Aluminum Lake and FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake

7-1/2 mg: D&C Yellow No. 10 Aluminum Lake and FD&C Yellow No. 6 Aluminum Lake

10 mg: Dye-free

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

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