Xtandi (Page 3 of 7)

6.2 Post-Marketing Experience

The following additional adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of XTANDI. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate the frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Body as a Whole: hypersensitivity (edema of the face, tongue, lip, or pharynx)

Gastrointestinal Disorders: vomiting

Neurological Disorders: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES)

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: rash

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Drugs that Inhibit CYP2C8

Co-administration of a strong CYP2C8 inhibitor (gemfibrozil) increased the composite area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of enzalutamide plus N-desmethyl enzalutamide by 2.2-fold. Co‑administration of XTANDI with strong CYP2C8 inhibitors should be avoided if possible. If co-administration of XTANDI with a strong CYP2C8 inhibitor cannot be avoided, reduce the dose of XTANDI [see Dosage and Administration (2.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.2 Drugs that Induce CYP3A4

Co-administration of rifampin (strong CYP3A4 inducer and moderate CYP2C8 inducer) decreased the composite AUC of enzalutamide plus N-desmethyl enzalutamide by 37%. Co-administration of strong CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, rifabutin, rifampin, rifapentine) with XTANDI should be avoided if possible. St John’s wort may decrease enzalutamide exposure and should be avoided. If co-administration of a strong CYP3A4 inducer with XTANDI cannot be avoided, increase the dose of XTANDI [see Dosage and Administration (2.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.3 Effect of XTANDI on Drug Metabolizing Enzymes

Enzalutamide is a strong CYP3A4 inducer and a moderate CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 inducer in humans. At steady-state, XTANDI reduced the plasma exposure to midazolam (CYP3A4 substrate), warfarin (CYP2C9 substrate), and omeprazole (CYP2C19 substrate). Concomitant use of XTANDI with narrow therapeutic index drugs that are metabolized by CYP3A4 (e.g., alfentanil, cyclosporine, dihydroergotamine, ergotamine, fentanyl, pimozide, quinidine, sirolimus and tacrolimus), CYP2C9 (e.g., phenytoin, warfarin) and CYP2C19 (e.g., S-mephenytoin, clopidogrel) should be avoided, as enzalutamide may decrease their exposure. If co-administration with warfarin cannot be avoided, conduct additional INR monitoring [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

The safety and efficacy of XTANDI have not been established in females. Based on animal reproductive studies and mechanism of action, XTANDI can cause fetal harm and loss of pregnancy. There are no human data on the use of XTANDI in pregnant females. In animal reproduction studies, oral administration of enzalutamide in pregnant mice during organogenesis caused adverse developmental effects at doses lower than the maximum recommended human dose (see Data).

Data

Animal Data

In an embryo-fetal developmental toxicity study in mice, enzalutamide caused developmental toxicity when administered at oral doses of 10 or 30 mg/kg/day throughout the period of organogenesis (gestational days 6-15). Findings included embryo-fetal lethality (increased post-implantation loss and resorptions) and decreased anogenital distance at ≥ 10 mg/kg/day, and cleft palate and absent palatine bone at 30 mg/kg/day. Doses of 30 mg/kg/day caused maternal toxicity. The doses tested in mice (1, 10 and 30 mg/kg/day) resulted in systemic exposures (AUC) approximately 0.04, 0.4 and 1.1 times, respectively, the exposures in patients. Enzalutamide did not cause developmental toxicity in rabbits when administered throughout the period of organogenesis (gestational days 6-18) at dose levels up to 10 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.4 times the exposures in patients based on AUC).

In a pharmacokinetic study in pregnant rats with a single oral 30 mg/kg enzalutamide administration on gestation day 14, enzalutamide and/or its metabolites were present in the fetus at a Cmax that was approximately 0.3 times the concentration found in maternal plasma and occurred 4 hours after administration.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

The safety and efficacy of XTANDI have not been established in females. There is no information available on the presence of XTANDI in human milk, the effects of the drug on the breastfed infant, or the effects of the drug on milk production. Enzalutamide and/or its metabolites were present in milk of lactating rats (see Data).

Data

Following a single oral administration in lactating rats on postnatal day 14, enzalutamide and/or its metabolites were present in milk at a Cmax that was 4 times higher than concentrations in the plasma and occurred 4 hours after administration.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Contraception

Males

Based on findings in animal reproduction studies, advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 3 months after the last dose of XTANDI [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)].

Infertility

Males

Based on animal studies, XTANDI may impair fertility in males of reproductive potential [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness of XTANDI in pediatric patients have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Of 4081 patients who received XTANDI in seven randomized, controlled clinical trials, 78% were 65 and over, while 35% were 75 and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

8.6 Patients with Renal Impairment

A dedicated renal impairment trial for XTANDI has not been conducted. Based on the population pharmacokinetic analysis using data from clinical trials in patients with metastatic CRPC and healthy volunteers, no significant difference in enzalutamide clearance was observed in patients with pre-existing mild to moderate renal impairment (30 mL/min ≤ creatinine clearance [CrCL] ≤ 89 mL/min) compared to patients and volunteers with baseline normal renal function (CrCL ≥ 90 mL/min). No initial dosage adjustment is necessary for patients with mild to moderate renal impairment. Severe renal impairment (CrCL < 30 mL/min) and end-stage renal disease have not been assessed [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8.7 Patients with Hepatic Impairment

Dedicated hepatic impairment trials compared the composite systemic exposure of enzalutamide plus N-desmethyl enzalutamide in volunteers with baseline mild, moderate, or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class A, B, or C, respectively) versus healthy controls with normal hepatic function. The composite AUC of enzalutamide plus N-desmethyl enzalutamide was similar in volunteers with mild, moderate, or severe baseline hepatic impairment compared to volunteers with normal hepatic function. No initial dosage adjustment is necessary for patients with baseline mild, moderate, or severe hepatic impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

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