Zoloft (Page 9 of 10)

14.3 Panic Disorder

The effectiveness of ZOLOFT in the treatment of PD was demonstrated in three double-blind, placebo-controlled studies (Studies PD-1, PD-2, and PD-3) of adult outpatients who had a primary diagnosis of PD (DSM-III-R), with or without agoraphobia.

  • Studies PD-1 and PD-2 were 10-week flexible dose studies of ZOLOFT (N=80 study PD-1 and N=88 study PD-2) compared to placebo (N=176 study PD-1 and PD-2). In both studies, ZOLOFT was initiated at 25 mg/day for the first week, then titrated in weekly increments of 50 mg per day to a maximum dose of 200 mg/day on the basis of clinical response and toleration. The mean ZOLOFT doses for completers to 10 weeks were 131 mg/day and 144 mg/day, respectively, for Studies PD-1 and PD-2. In these studies, ZOLOFT was shown to be statistically significantly more effective than placebo on change from baseline in panic attack frequency and on the Clinical Global Impression Severity (CGI-S) of Illness and Global Improvement (CGI-I) scores. The difference between ZOLOFT and placebo in reduction from baseline in the number of full panic attacks was approximately 2 panic attacks per week in both studies.
  • Study PD-3 was a 12-week randomized, double-blind fixed-dose study, including ZOLOFT doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/day. Patients receiving ZOLOFT (50 mg N=43, 100 mg N=44, 200 mg N=45) experienced a statistically significantly greater reduction in panic attack frequency than patients receiving placebo (N=45). Study PD-3 was not readily interpretable regarding a dose response relationship for effectiveness.

Subgroup analyses did not indicate that there were any differences in treatment outcomes as a function of age, race, or gender.

In Study PD-4, patients meeting DSM-III-R criteria for PD who had responded during a 52-week open trial on ZOLOFT 50–200 mg/day (n=183) were randomized to continuation of ZOLOFT or to substitution of placebo for up to 28 weeks of observation for discontinuation due to relapse or insufficient clinical response. Response during the open phase was defined as a CGI-I score of 1(very much improved) or 2 (much improved). Insufficient clinical response in the double-blind phase indicated a worsening of the patient’s condition that resulted in study discontinuation, as assessed by the investigator. Relapse during the double-blind phase was defined as the following conditions being met on three consecutive visits:

  • CGI-I ≥ 3;
  • meets DSM-III-R criteria for PD;
  • number of panic attacks greater than at baseline.

Patients receiving continued ZOLOFT treatment experienced a statistically significantly lower rate of discontinuation due to relapse or insufficient clinical response over the subsequent 28 weeks compared to those receiving placebo. This pattern was demonstrated in male and female subjects.

14.4 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

The effectiveness of ZOLOFT in the treatment of PTSD was established in two multicenter placebo-controlled studies (Studies PSTD-1 and PSTD-2) of adult outpatients who met DSM-III-R criteria for PTSD. The mean duration of PTSD for these patients was 12 years (Studies PSTD-1 and PSTD-2 combined) and 44% of patients (169 of the 385 patients treated) had secondary depressive disorder.

Studies PSTD-1 and PSTD-2 were 12-week flexible dose studies. ZOLOFT was initiated at 25 mg/day for the first week, and titrated in weekly increments of 50 mg per day to a maximum dose of 200 mg/day on the basis of clinical response and tolerability. The mean ZOLOFT dose for completers was 146 mg/day and 151 mg/day, respectively, for Studies PSTD-1 and PSTD-2. Study outcome was assessed by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale Part 2 (CAPS), which is a multi-item instrument that measures the three PTSD diagnostic symptom clusters of reexperiencing/intrusion, avoidance/numbing, and hyperarousal as well as the patient-rated Impact of Event Scale (IES), which measures intrusion and avoidance symptoms. Patients receiving ZOLOFT (N=99 and N=94, respectively) showed statistically significant improvement compared to placebo (N=83 and N=92) on change from baseline to endpoint on the CAPS, IES, and on the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI-S) Severity of Illness and Global Improvement (CGI-I) scores.

In two additional placebo-controlled PTSD trials (Studies PSTD-3 and PSTD-4), the difference in response to treatment between patients receiving ZOLOFT and patients receiving placebo was not statistically significant. One of these additional studies was conducted in patients similar to those recruited for Studies PSTD-1 and PSTD-2, while the second additional study was conducted in predominantly male veterans.

As PTSD is a more common disorder in women than men, the majority (76%) of patients in Studies PSTD-1 and PSTD-2 described above were women. Post hoc exploratory analyses revealed a statistically significant difference between ZOLOFT and placebo on the CAPS, IES and CGI in women, regardless of baseline diagnosis of comorbid major depressive disorder, but essentially no effect in the relatively smaller number of men in these studies. The clinical significance of this apparent gender effect is unknown at this time. There was insufficient information to determine the effect of race or age on outcome.

In Study PSTD-5, patients meeting DSM-III-R criteria for PTSD who had responded during a 24-week open trial on ZOLOFT 50–200 mg/day (n=96) were randomized to continuation of ZOLOFT or to substitution of placebo for up to 28 weeks of observation for relapse. Response during the open phase was defined as a CGI-I of 1 (very much improved) or 2 (much improved), and a decrease in the CAPS-2 score of > 30% compared to baseline. Relapse during the double-blind phase was defined as the following conditions being met on two consecutive visits:

  • CGI-I ≥ 3;
  • CAPS-2 score increased by ≥ 30% and by ≥ 15 points relative to baseline; and
  • worsening of the patient’s condition in the investigator’s judgment.

Patients receiving continued ZOLOFT treatment experienced statistically significantly lower relapse rates over the subsequent 28 weeks compared to those receiving placebo. This pattern was demonstrated in male and female subjects.

14.5 Social Anxiety Disorder

The effectiveness of ZOLOFT in the treatment of SAD (also known as social phobia) was established in two multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled studies (Study SAD-1 and SAD-2) of adult outpatients who met DSM-IV criteria for SAD.

Study SAD-1 was a 12-week, flexible dose study comparing ZOLOFT (50–200 mg/day), n=211, to placebo, n=204, in which ZOLOFT was initiated at 25 mg/day for the first week, then titrated to the maximum tolerated dose in 50 mg increments biweekly. Study outcomes were assessed by the:

  • Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), a 24-item clinician administered instrument that measures fear, anxiety, and avoidance of social and performance situations, and
  • Proportion of responders as defined by the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I) criterion of CGI-I ≤ 2 (very much or much improved).

ZOLOFT was statistically significantly more effective than placebo as measured by the LSAS and the percentage of responders.

Study SAD-2 was a 20-week, flexible dose study that compared ZOLOFT (50–200 mg/day), n=135, to placebo, n=69. ZOLOFT was titrated to the maximum tolerated dose in 50 mg increments every 3 weeks. Study outcome was assessed by the:

  • Duke Brief Social Phobia Scale (BSPS), a multi-item clinician-rated instrument that measures fear, avoidance and physiologic response to social or performance situations,
  • Marks Fear Questionnaire Social Phobia Subscale (FQ-SPS), a 5-item patient-rated instrument that measures change in the severity of phobic avoidance and distress, and
  • CGI-I responder criterion of ≤ 2.

ZOLOFT was shown to be statistically significantly more effective than placebo as measured by the BSPS total score and fear, avoidance and physiologic factor scores, as well as the FQ-SPS total score, and to have statistically significantly more responders than placebo as defined by the CGI-I. Subgroup analyses did not suggest differences in treatment outcome on the basis of gender. There was insufficient information to determine the effect of race or age on outcome.

In Study SAD-3, patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for SAD who had responded while assigned to ZOLOFT (CGI-I of 1 or 2) during a 20-week placebo-controlled trial on ZOLOFT 50–200 mg/day were randomized to continuation of ZOLOFT or to substitution of placebo for up to 24 weeks of observation for relapse. Relapse was defined as ≥ 2 point increase in the Clinical Global Impression Severity of Illness (CGI-S) score compared to baseline or study discontinuation due to lack of efficacy. Patients receiving ZOLOFT continuation treatment experienced a statistically significantly lower relapse rate during this 24-week period than patients randomized to placebo substitution.

14.6 Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

The effectiveness of ZOLOFT for the treatment of PMDD was established in two double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled flexible dose trials (Studies PMDD-1 and PMDD-2) conducted over 3 menstrual cycles in adult female patients. The effectiveness of ZOLOFT for PMDD for more than 3 menstrual cycles has not been systematically evaluated in controlled trials.

Patients in Study PMDD-1 met DSM-III-R criteria for Late Luteal Phase Dysphoric Disorder (LLPDD), the clinical entity referred to as PMDD in DSM-IV. Patients in Study PMDD-2 met DSM-IV criteria for PMDD. Study PMDD-1 utilized continuous daily dosing throughout the study, while Study PMDD-2 utilized luteal phase dosing (intermittent dosing) for the 2 weeks prior to the onset of menses. The mean duration of PMDD symptoms was approximately 10.5 years in both studies. Patients taking oral contraceptives were excluded from these trials; therefore, the efficacy of ZOLOFT in combination with oral contraceptives for the treatment of PMDD is unknown.

Efficacy was assessed with the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP), a patient-rated instrument that mirrors the diagnostic criteria for PMDD as identified in the DSM-IV, and includes assessments for mood, physical symptoms, and other symptoms. Other efficacy assessments included the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17), and the Clinical Global Impression Severity of Illness (CGI-S) and Improvement (CGI-I) scores.

  • In Study PMDD-1, involving 251 randomized patients, (n=125 on ZOLOFT and n=126 on placebo), ZOLOFT treatment was initiated at 50 mg/day and administered daily throughout the menstrual cycle. In subsequent cycles, ZOLOFT was titrated in 50 mg increments at the beginning of each menstrual cycle up to a maximum of 150 mg/day on the basis of clinical response and tolerability. The mean dose for completers was 102 mg/day. ZOLOFT administered daily throughout the menstrual cycle was statistically significantly more effective than placebo on change from baseline to endpoint on the DRSP total score, the HAMD-17 total score, and the CGI-S score, as well as the CGI-I score at endpoint.
  • In Study PMDD-2, involving 281 randomized patients, (n=142 on ZOLOFT and n=139 on placebo), ZOLOFT treatment was initiated at 50 mg/day in the late luteal phase (last 2 weeks) of each menstrual cycle and then discontinued at the onset of menses (intermittent dosing). In subsequent cycles, patients were dosed in the range of 50–100 mg/day in the luteal phase of each cycle, on the basis of clinical response and tolerability. Patients who received 100 mg/day started with 50 mg/day for the first 3 days of the cycle, then 100 mg/day for the remainder of the cycle. The mean ZOLOFT dose for completers was 74 mg/day. ZOLOFT administered in the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle was statistically significantly more effective than placebo on change from baseline to endpoint on the DRSP total score and the CGI-S score, as well as the CGI-I score at endpoint (Week 12).

There was insufficient information to determine the effect of race or age on outcome in these studies.

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